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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Friend of mine is selling his house in kentucky and wants to repaint it before he puts it on the market.. I don't know what kind of wood it is but is it a good idea to pressure wash it first? Or would you suggest scraping it?

We pressure wash fences and decks but when its a cedar fence it makes the wood look hairy. Not to mention if the man with the trigger doesn't watch it, the pressure will gouge the hell out of the wood. Is not my trade but its part of the job sometimes so I thought I'd ask..

Ps he is also looking for a contractor in ky if anyone is close by...glasco ky I think..
 

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We always pressure wash before painting. Its the chemicals that do work, not the power of the machine. We never use high pressure close to the house, generally only 1000-2000 psi (at 4 gpm).
 

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ooks like aluminum to me.Don't know what you mean by "real siding".If he's going to repaint,take it down to the metal.Prime and paint.If he is not planning on repainting,better keep the PW away.
 

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ooks like aluminum to me.Don't know what you mean by "real siding".If he's going to repaint,take it down to the metal.Prime and paint.If he is not planning on repainting,better keep the PW away.
No need to take it down to metal. Just wash, prime and paint.
 

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The reason I suggested taking it off is because there are spots that are peeling badly.When you start to pressure was there will be a whole lot more.
 

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He can pressure wash, but don't run it too close, don't spray at an up angle, and don't spray around doors or windows or the doors and windows themselves.

For a time, pressure washing exterior paint on an old house was banned by name by the EPA as a prohibited practice, but I think it's still OK for HOs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One bid at 1300, one bid at 2700... what should he ask the contractors? And how good is porter paint, we've never heard of it..
 

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First let me say if the house is old enough then rrp rules apply. I would start there.

Second thing, injecting water into wood is the worst idea ever. There are much smarter, safer, and better / longer lasting ways to prep wood siding. I have yet to see a painter use a moisture meter after pressure washing and before paint.
I have yet to see someone use a pressure washer on a wood floor but for some reason we think it's perfectly OK for the siding on our house?

Its called building science for a reason.
Mike
 

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Your proposed method?
Pick one,

Scrapers/sanding with hepa vac attachments, properly contained media blasting ( corn cob, walnut shells) to name a couple,

anything but adding water to wood.

Notice I said better, safer, and longer lasting, didn't say faster or easier, or less expensive. :)

Mike
 

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Interesting, all those methods except scraping historically have been little used until recently. If you're taking the surface down to bare wood, and vacuuming as you go, there wouldn't be a need to clean the surface further before painting. Otherwise, you wind up washing.

Getting the wood to dry adequately is another story - I imagine there are some areas where it's a breeze, and others where it's impossible.
 

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Notice I said better, safer, and longer lasting
Surface prep is always key and something of an art. I did some test patches of different prep techniques on an old building a couple decades ago - just sanding didn't give the best results. The section that adhered best and is longest lasting was actually sopping wet during the prep process. I do use a moisture meter, so it was ~14% when it was primed.
 

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Getting the wood to dry adequately is another story - I imagine there are some areas where it's a breeze, and others where it's impossible.
Plus add weather, humidity, only so many hours in a day, etc. etc.

I'm sure in Arizona pressure washing would work ok,

my experience is limited to the Midwest, and the Northeast. Though after this winter Arizona's looking mighty fine.

Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
That was kinda my concern. Especially it being storm season now. Hed be looking at 3 days dry time IF it were sunny right?

He found a guy that washes and bleaches by hand w a sponge. No pressure washer. The guy sounds like he knows what he is doing and cares about the job. He told my friend it would take him about 5 days to complete with him and one other worker.. sounds about right to me. His price was right in the middle too, he got the job. They shook on it, no contract. that's the way I wish every job was..
 

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That was kinda my concern. Especially it being storm season now. Hed be looking at 3 days dry time IF it were sunny right?

He found a guy that washes and bleaches by hand w a sponge. No pressure washer. The guy sounds like he knows what he is doing and cares about the job. He told my friend it would take him about 5 days to complete with him and one other worker.. sounds about right to me. His price was right in the middle too, he got the job. They shook on it, no contract. that's the way I wish every job was..
I've seen it take close to a month on a sheltered North wall. Power wash or hand wash, it has to get dry enough.

Doing it by hand has the benefit of not having a little accident with the power washer and blowing water into the wall / window trim / fuzzing things up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thank you much guys for the comments, ill be sure to post the after pics along with any useful info we learn from this job. Hopefully its all positive.
 

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Pick one,

Scrapers/sanding with hepa vac attachments, properly contained media blasting ( corn cob, walnut shells) to name a couple,

anything but adding water to wood.

Notice I said better, safer, and longer lasting, didn't say faster or easier, or less expensive. :)

Mike

You're right, it's called building science, but there needs to be a level of common sense applied to that science.

You do realize, dry wood will return to dry in a matter of days, right?

Pressure washing, then painting the same day is a bad idea, but 48 hours later, with warm temps, low humidity & sun, the moisture introduced will no longer cause paint problems.
 
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