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I like Green things
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23,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #62 ·
Chestnut, poplar,walnut, butternut,
red oak, white oak, elm,ash, beech,
catalpa, locust,hickory,...........

That's too funny right there. Usually they used whatever was close to home. Go cut it down, mill it and build it. All most all the old barns around here are either white oak or chesnut.
 

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The Remodeler
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1,536 Posts
what about heart pine?

DING DING DING!!!!

He's right... It's heart pine. And yes, it flakes exactly like Warners last picture when left unfinished for a long time.

It was used a lot here on Long Island in the old homes, I have it in my own. It's a pain in the ass sanding off 75 years of neglect, but looks great when refinished.
 

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I like Green things
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23,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #66 ·
DING DING DING!!!!

He's right... It's heart pine. And yes, it flakes exactly like Warners last picture when left unfinished for a long time.

It was used a lot here on Long Island in the old homes, I have it in my own. It's a pain in the ass sanding off 75 years of neglect, but looks great when refinished.

I am not trying to argue but, I am certain it is probably not heart pine.

It is a rare find to find heart pine in any house around here.

Remember, Indiana was full of big old hard wood trees like, oak, elm, chestnut, hickory and such.

This is also an old farm house that was more than likley built with timber that was growing close.
 

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I like Green things
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23,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #74 ·
Alex- you are right about the flakey board. That has happened to only 4 boards in the house. One thing, I have no knots either.

This actually kind of fun, I should go take a picture of a door I have from 1860 and let you guys try to figure out what it is.
 

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Curmudgeon
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11,706 Posts
Still like to see a better shot
of that end grain, but it's hard
to compare real old growth grain
to new lumber.
Leaning more to ash or chestnut,
white oak is third and fading....
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
I guess since it's your kitchen floor regardless of it's true identity, call it what ever you want.:laughing:

I would call it ash to anyone that knew anything. But at a cocktail party with general civilians, I might refer to it as chestnut. It has a more exotic ring to it.
 

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I like Green things
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23,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #78 ·
I guess since it's your kitchen floor regardless of it's true identity, call it what ever you want.:laughing:

I would call it ash to anyone that knew anything. But at a cocktail party with general civilians, I might refer to it as chestnut. It has a more exotic ring to it.
Hey old timer, the Ash is the crap on the saw horses, I know that!!!

It's the other stuff, I am not sure about!!

You been medicating tonight?:laughing:
 

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I like Green things
Joined
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23,050 Posts
Discussion Starter · #79 ·
Still like to see a better shot
of that end grain, but it's hard
to compare real old growth grain
to new lumber.
Leaning more to ash or chestnut,
white oak is third and fading....

What would you like to see?

A nice VG one?
More of a flat sawn one?
Rift sawn?
One with a pretty lady holding it? :laughing:


or all of the above?

I can still clean up a side of that floor joist.
 

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Maker of fine kindling
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6,199 Posts
Hey old timer, the Ash is the crap on the saw horses, I know that!!!

It's the other stuff, I am not sure about!!

You been medicating tonight?:laughing:
Just one margarita with the fish tacos tonight. But at my age I don't need meds to be confused.

I left for a while and missed about 3 pages of babble about this dilemma of yours. I must have missed something. Please forgive me as I have flaws.:notworthy
 
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