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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My company recently purchased a company that was a competitor. They have a nice cliental list but never did any follow ups with old clients, did a job and moved on. Majority of their work came from Circuit City when they were in business. Hence the reasons for not being too successful and wanting out.

Since we now own the subcontractor that did the install work and circuit city is out of business we are looking at the best options to retain these clients and notify them of a change and offer products/services.

We have thought of postcards, letters, and phone calls. All seem like they could work but the work was done some time ago so a phone call we chance they will not remember. Postcards and letters risk being thrown out. We are looking at offering a small gift card for signing up on our site or purchasing an item.

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
 

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Send a personal letter to the President and manager of the local sites. The "trickle down system" works, but can be a little slow if you are impatient.
 

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I would start out with a letter and then keep in contact on a monthly basis.

You could find a source for newsletters and send that on a monthly basis.

Offer a $100 gift card for repeat business and referrals.
 

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When a competitor is bought, you never get as high a percentage of the business that they had for many reasons.

You can write off the Circuit City historical sales and have to concentrate on letting other know of your abilites and the qualified installers that you may have been able to retain. You did not buy the employees since many do not want to work for an old competitor.

You have to talk to the employees that remained to find out who were the customers that they had good experiences with and make personal contacts to these people. If they are important, it would be good to take them to a personal meeting to develope a bond with the potential customer and to improve the relationship with employees.

Some people do not feel good about dealing with a contractor that just outlasted a competitor if they do not know they will deal with. - It is usually a new ball game.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
When a competitor is bought, you never get as high a percentage of the business that they had for many reasons.

You can write off the Circuit City historical sales and have to concentrate on letting other know of your abilites and the qualified installers that you may have been able to retain. You did not buy the employees since many do not want to work for an old competitor.

You have to talk to the employees that remained to find out who were the customers that they had good experiences with and make personal contacts to these people. If they are important, it would be good to take them to a personal meeting to develope a bond with the potential customer and to improve the relationship with employees.

Some people do not feel good about dealing with a contractor that just outlasted a competitor if they do not know they will deal with. - It is usually a new ball game.
I agree with you. However, as this company lost work they lost several of their installers. The customer service rep we did manage to speak with and we were told the jobs were completed and made sure of satisfaction, but after that the customer was forgotten. Chances of the customers remembering an experience is doubtful, in my opinion. Although the rep is very good and might remember speaking with her.

It is like finding a list of names in a box...you know they are your target market, but you have to pitch them correctly.
 
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