Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
101 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok first off im actually curious what kind of blades people use. i use stanleys, but theres goto be better out their. their pretty weak if you ask me.

But for Snips my mind is made up.
The Midwest snips


With a replacable blade, big handles for those swollen roofer hands, and the power to cut shingles like butter, also good for cutting square cuts for various metal work, drip/rake edge, flashing etc.

And for more technical cuts for flashing and what not.
The Lenox snips

They defiently go the extra mile. longer handle then the traditional wiss snips and a lot sharper to.
 

·
APPLIED RIGHT
Joined
·
383 Posts
I use Bennett blades,half the cost of Stanleys and you can wear them to a nub.As for snips,I like the Malcos'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,678 Posts
I've almost always used the hook blades from Sheffield England with very good luck. $40 buys 100. I have tried a few off Ebay and it's about a 50/50 shot. Of the four purchases two were garbage blades while the other two were good. Have paid $10-20 for a 100 pack shipped.

As far as tin snips I just use the Wiss 10 inch duckbill. They work good for cutting the metal I work with. Never used a snips to cut shingles. The Wiss fits great in my loop and never falls out. To be honest they normaly get lost or taken from other subs before they go dull.
 

·
GC
Joined
·
190 Posts
I've almost always used the hook blades from Sheffield England with very good luck. $40 buys 100. I have tried a few off Ebay and it's about a 50/50 shot. Of the four purchases two were garbage blades while the other two were good. Have paid $10-20 for a 100 pack shipped.

As far as tin snips I just use the Wiss 10 inch duckbill. They work good for cutting the metal I work with. Never used a snips to cut shingles. The Wiss fits great in my loop and never falls out. To be honest they normaly get lost or taken from other subs before they go dull.

When cutting shingles Snips are the way to go. Use my knife for paper and opening packs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
I've almost always used the hook blades from Sheffield England with very good luck. $40 buys 100. I have tried a few off Ebay and it's about a 50/50 shot. Of the four purchases two were garbage blades while the other two were good. Have paid $10-20 for a 100 pack shipped.

As far as tin snips I just use the Wiss 10 inch duckbill. They work good for cutting the metal I work with. Never used a snips to cut shingles. The Wiss fits great in my loop and never falls out. To be honest they normaly get lost or taken from other subs before they go dull.
The Sheffield blades with meat on 'em, not the pointy ones.

I used to use a 12" set of Wiss scissors, but find 10" suffice well enough nowadays (less weight to boot). I always keep an old crusty pair of snips around for cutting valleys or rakes.

And you're right, they will most often wander off before they get worn out. In fact that has always been the case for me.
 

·
Don't Eat Yellow Snow!
Joined
·
401 Posts
I use 12" gilbo snips and not that bothered about the blades as i go though that many, it wouldnt mater if they were made by the Sheep shaggers(Shefield) or not!
Cheers
Dave
 

·
Roofing Sage
Joined
·
3,409 Posts
I have the forearm of a chronic masterbater so cutting shingles for me is far easier with a Big Deep Hook Blade (AJC makes the best I've found).




I just never got to liking cutting shingles with shears/snips. I do appreciate them for cutting shingles around protrusions like posts of intersecting flat roof rails and tricky area tie-ins.

But, a good knife (The Stanly Titan is THE BEST) with a nice Big Deep Hook Blade is simply (for me) the best.





Any of Roofer that I've worked with that I've lent my knife to has fallen in love with the Titan. That and a traditional Roofer's Knife and I'm good.
 

·
Roofing Sage
Joined
·
3,409 Posts
As for snips/shears, Wiss.

I carry a small Wiss shear in my belt at all times.

It stays in place far easier than regular snips and has 1 3/4" cutting length
(more than enough for most drip edge work).

 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top