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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry to bore, this most likely is not a real brain bender for seasoned pros. And in this case, by "seasoned" I mean in business more than 2 weeks.

How do you include a specific start finish date in your contract if you don't know when you will have permit in hand?

thanks in advance
 

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Sean
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The start date can be when you start the permit process or the projected date can be the projected date when you should have permit in hand. I would go with option 1 & state that the approx permit time = 4, 6, 8 weeks or months. Sometimes you can get a demo permit to start the work while going through the regular building permit

You should have a clause in your contracts for extending the finish date for items outside of contractor control - i.e. acts of god, bureaucrats that think there god, etc...
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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"Anticipated Start Date:#####
Anticipated Completion Date:#####

Contractor will apply for permits on acceptance of this agreement. Actual start date will be within X days of permit being issued.

Contractor not resonsible for delays caused by.... "
 

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Nest Home Improvement
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890 Posts
"Anticipated Start Date:#####
Anticipated Completion Date:#####

Contractor will apply for permits on acceptance of this agreement. Actual start date will be within X days of permit being issued.

Contractor not resonsible for delays caused by.... "

Your agreement needs to include language to account for delays beyond your control example: weather, permitting, material shortages etc.
 

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Builder/Remodeler
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Since none of us are attorneys and as such cannot give you legal advice--my post was for entertainment purposes only... :whistling

(And yes... always include the common CYA language regarding weather, acts of god, shortages of material, plagues, vengeful acts of ex wives/girlfriends, family strife, stubbed toes, etc. etc. etc.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
thank you for the response guys. I do have an Acts of God, arson, etc clause, so I suppose I would be covered by that.
"Anticipated", I use it frequently when talking with the client about there project, not sure why I didn't think to use it in this line of the contract:rolleyes:
 

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JimmyS
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also

I have a line in our contract that says:
Any significant changes, alterations, or additions to, or deletions from the drawings, specifications, stipulations and scope of work for this project ordered by any public body, utility, or inspector, shall constitute a change in the work, and shall be documented in and paid for by Change Orders.
My language, not a lawyer's. It's to cover for cranky inspectors, etc.

Also, I put all the time delays on Change Orders, not just the money/spec changes. I always have a revised completion date on each CO. I also have language that says there's no penalty if our proposed start/finish dates are not met exactly. The CO is the main tool here, as you can add days easily and show the customer where his choices pushed the finish out. My CO form has about 7 lines, each with a "crew-days" number showing how much time the customer agrees will be added to the completion date.
It doesn't make the next-in-line customer happy, but at least you're not arguing about why-aren't-you-done-yet with the current one.
Jim
 
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