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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a few years since I installed a water heater. I have a couple of Richmond 40 gal natural gas 12 year warranty (energy star) to install. The first thing I noticed is that they have no legs and the combustion air is drawn in through some perforations on the sides near the bottom. They just sit flat on the ground.

What is being used to elevate them? Four or more bricks? Half high concrete block? Obviously I don't want them in contact with the concrete slab in the basement.
 

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The reason that they need to be elevated in garages is that the vapors from spilled gasoline or other combustible fluids will lay on the floor and ignite.

The newer heaters are “FVIR” or flammable vapor ignition resistant and technically can sit on the floor but many jurisdictions don't recognize this.
 

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sit it right on the slab or in a safety pan
What's the difference between the concrete slab and a concrete block. they are both concrete.
There is nothing however wrong with elevating them.
I "cringe" when I see any water heater sitting right on the concrete. This makes them rot out -shortening their life big time! Wood, Fiberglass, etc for a electric heater- brick or a metal grid, etc for the gas & yes even the half block is better than having them sit on the slab................
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the suggestions.

I think I'll put them up on some bricks laid on their sides and I'll cut small pieces of leftover 1" polystyrene to place atop the bricks.

I think this will keep the bottom from rusting out and looking like crappola.
 

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solar guy
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I "cringe" when I see any water heater sitting right on the concrete. This makes them rot out -shortening their life big time! Wood, Fiberglass, etc for a electric heater- brick or a metal grid, etc for the gas & yes even the half block is better than having them sit on the slab................
Ha around here the water is so bad they rot out from the inside first.
 

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areal plumber is right. All gas heaters are FVIR now BY LAW. they no longer have to sit on a raised platform. As far as them rusting out, sit that baby on the slab. All heaters have rubber feet on the bottom these days, and if you are really paranoid about it, set it in a pan.;)
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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Codes & regulations aside, I prefer to elevate a heater anyway. Sooner or later you're going to need to drain the thing, and having it several inches off the floor can make that much less of a chore.
 

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Codes & regulations aside, I prefer to elevate a heater anyway. Sooner or later you're going to need to drain the thing, and having it several inches off the floor can make that much less of a chore.
How would it make it MUCH less of a chore? Its a matter of screwing the hose on the drain valve and turning it on and giving the heater air so it will drain. Put it were you want but raising it to get the the drain is not a valid reason.
 

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How would it make it MUCH less of a chore? Its a matter of screwing the hose on the drain valve and turning it on and giving the heater air so it will drain. Put it were you want but raising it to get the the drain is not a valid reason.
First off I don't care if the new ones have rubber feet or not- i have found thru the "years" no matter what appliance it is, they will last longer if they are not sitting on a concrete slab. There is a drawing energy there.
Also I very much agree with the above making it less of a "chore". It is not always that simple as you say it is- most of them I change out- the drain valve plugs up on them from the crap built up inside of the tank. It is very hard to clean them to get the flow going again, when the drain valve is right next to the floor. Sometimes it is very hard to completely drain them unless you "Tip" which you can do if it is elevated & still come out the drain valve. Try that if it is just sitting on the slab ! Much easier to bring out of the basement completely empty !!
So Yes there are many valid reasons to elevate them....................
 

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First off I don't care if the new ones have rubber feet or not- i have found thru the "years" no matter what appliance it is, they will last longer if they are not sitting on a concrete slab. There is a drawing energy there.
Also I very much agree with the above making it less of a "chore". It is not always that simple as you say it is- most of them I change out- the drain valve plugs up on them from the crap built up inside of the tank. It is very hard to clean them to get the flow going again, when the drain valve is right next to the floor. Sometimes it is very hard to completely drain them unless you "Tip" which you can do if it is elevated & still come out the drain valve. Try that if it is just sitting on the slab ! Much easier to bring out of the basement completely empty !!
So Yes there are many valid reasons to elevate them....................
First off the water heaters tank is inside the jacket of the heater(the part you see) so sitting the OUTSIDE COVERING on the floor will not affect the TANK INSIDE. Second off if you knew what you were doing when the drain valves get clogged up you would pump the water out from the top like a plumber does or pump it out from the top from the start because its faster. Most of the rust you see on the outside of a water heater's jacket comes from the owners using all the hot water resulting in cold water filling a warm tank...this results in condensation that will eat the tank from the outside in and cause the outter jacket to rust out. You can also just turn the water on for a few minutes initially to help clean the bottom of the heater out so it will not clog your drain valve....but theres no majic bullet...thats why i carry a pump to remove the water from the top and leave the drain valve alone. This is why plumbing should be left to a REALPLUMBER so the heater can be properly sized to the application as a undersized heater will fail quicker and cause the bottom of the jacket to rust away as condensation runs between the insulation and the inner tank. Get the picture now?:whistling
P.S. I never said anything about rubber feet:thumbsup:
 

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Superior Firepower
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The reason that they need to be elevated in garages is that the vapors from spilled gasoline or other combustible fluids will lay on the floor and ignite.

The newer heaters are “FVIR” or flammable vapor ignition resistant and technically can sit on the floor but many jurisdictions don't recognize this.
Thank You for this valuable post.

It can sit directly on the slab if the slab stays dry and your gas/plumbing code allows it,most do allow the new fvir heaters to sit on the floor.
Show us the code.

It's been a few years since I installed a water heater. I have a couple of Richmond 40 gal natural gas 12 year warranty (energy star) to install. The first thing I noticed is that they have no legs and the combustion air is drawn in through some perforations on the sides near the bottom. They just sit flat on the ground.

What is being used to elevate them? Four or more bricks? Half high concrete block? Obviously I don't want them in contact with the concrete slab in the basement.
Garage? Basement? A minimum +16" wood framed structure with a PT mud sill will do just fine.
sit it right on the slab or in a safety pan
What's the difference between the concrete slab and a concrete block. they are both concrete.
There is nothing however wrong with elevating them.
How would it make it MUCH less of a chore? Its a matter of screwing the hose on the drain valve and turning it on and giving the heater air so it will drain. Put it were you want but raising it to get the the drain is not a valid reason.
First off the water heaters tank is inside the jacket of the heater(the part you see) so sitting the OUTSIDE COVERING on the floor will not affect the TANK INSIDE. Second off if you knew what you were doing when the drain valves get clogged up you would pump the water out from the top like a plumber does or pump it out from the top from the start because its faster. Most of the rust you see on the outside of a water heater's jacket comes from the owners using all the hot water resulting in cold water filling a warm tank...this results in condensation that will eat the tank from the outside in and cause the outter jacket to rust out. You can also just turn the water on for a few minutes initially to help clean the bottom of the heater out so it will not clog your drain valve....but theres no majic bullet...thats why i carry a pump to remove the water from the top and leave the drain valve alone. This is why plumbing should be left to a REALPLUMBER so the heater can be properly sized to the application as a undersized heater will fail quicker and cause the bottom of the jacket to rust away as condensation runs between the insulation and the inner tank. Get the picture now?:whistling
P.S. I never said anything about rubber feet:thumbsup:
And when the HO stores gasoline in the basement with the FG fired water heater, and the fumes ignite and level the house, with everybody in it because the water heater was not elevated, where will the real, arrogant plumber be? Get the picture now?
 

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Thank You for this valuable post.

Show us the code.

Garage? Basement? A minimum +16" wood framed structure with a PT mud sill will do just fine.




And when the HO stores gasoline in the basement with the FG fired water heater, and the fumes ignite and level the house, with everybody in it because the water heater was not elevated, where will the real, arrogant plumber be? Get the picture now?
Codes vary from place to place so what my code says doesn't apply to you,however the water heater manufacturers allow for a gas fired to be installed in a garage on the floor if YOUR LOCAL CODE WILL ALLOW IT. What makes you think that raising the heater gives absolute protection? Most basements dont have ventilation as there are no doors that are at floor level for the fumes to escape through....it would pool in the basement until it filled up to the level of your water heaters burner. Get the picture? Ever hear of a water heater igniting fumes even though it was raised 18" above the floor? I have. I'm not gonna waste my time trying to prove it you as you will find out the hard way one day if you rely on the 18' rule.:thumbsup:
 

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Superior Firepower
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Codes vary from place to place so what my code says doesn't apply to you,however the water heater manufacturers allow for a gas fired to be installed in a garage on the floor if YOUR LOCAL CODE WILL ALLOW IT. What makes you think that raising the heater gives absolute protection? Most basements dont have ventilation as there are no doors that are at floor level for the fumes to escape through....it would pool in the basement until it filled up to the level of your water heaters burner. Get the picture? Ever hear of a water heater igniting fumes even though it was raised 18" above the floor? I have. I'm not gonna waste my time trying to prove it you as you will find out the hard way one day if you rely on the 18' rule.:thumbsup:
X2​
:thumbup:
 
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