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Superior Firepower
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The grinder should be for cutting out things that will get covered, like a heating grate or the shower valve eschution.

Nobody is cutting porcelain or ceramic with a grinder that looks as good as cut with a wet saw. That picture posted is limestone which don't count. :whistling
Hardbody porcelin and Travertine actually. Score and snap, 1/16" grout joints. :eek:

Wet saws give me pneumonia. :sad:

The majority of the shower valve cut out was done from the back. ;)
 

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Grand Rapids Remodeling
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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Yeah that's another benefit of a grinder, radius cuts. I would like to know from you true tile guy's is do you have smaller wheels in your stash to make tighter radius cuts? The standard size wheel has been fine for my use like around a closet flange but how about a tighter radius?

www.phbconstruction.com
 

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Superior Firepower
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Yeah that's another benefit of a grinder, radius cuts. I would like to know from you true tile guy's is do you have smaller wheels in your stash to make tighter radius cuts? The standard size wheel has been fine for my use like around a closet flange but how about a tighter radius?
Radius on this shower drain was done with the AG. Closet flanges are 7".
 

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Paulie
What model Sigma did you get? Is it a 20" or 26" You will love it more and more as time goes on!
Craig
 

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Sky
Nice looking Set

How did they mount the shower door around the bench? I always have to leave the outside edge open for the fixed glass.
Craig
 

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Grand Rapids Remodeling
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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
Paulie
What model Sigma did you get? Is it a 20" or 26" You will love it more and more as time goes on!
Craig
Ya know I bought it last year and used it about 6 times and can't remember what size it is. I'd go out to the garage and look for ya but it's hard to leave the warm comfortable house to rummage around out in the cold. I'll pm you tomorrow. Like I said I love it already the small amount I've used it. It's paid for itself in time already. It was recommended by a commercial tile guy I know, I was amazed when I asked him what wet saw to buy he told me he rarely uses one anymore only the sigma.

I'm bidding a big tile job Weds. , upstairs bath, downstairs bath and a hallway. Well it's big for me LOL. Hope I get to use the Sigma on that one. The pic skyhook posted is exactly what the HO wants, bench and curb with a offset drain.
www.phbconstruction.com
 

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4" dry blade on a AG.
Score with the Sigma then follow up with the grinder, works great. Nice crisp lines. Follow up with a rub block for a micro bevel. Takes a little practice playing with blade rotation. Now if I could only get my Sigma to cut and snap 3/8" off a tile I would be happy. Min. I can cut is 1/2".
 

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Superior Firepower
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Sky
Nice looking Set

How did they mount the shower door around the bench? I always have to leave the outside edge open for the fixed glass.
Craig
1/2" tempered glass. Cut to match the radius on the bench. Silicone in the (2) vertical aluminum channels. The 28" door swings off the other wall.
 

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Tiling & Bath Contractor
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270 Posts
I watched the video and maybe this guy is slow, but it looks like it takes way too long to do a straight cut. And too must dust as well. My clinker would do it in about 5 seconds. I use either my Felker or my larger Rubi.

I do occasionally use my rotozip with a 4" dry diamond blade for certain cuts, but I'll stick with my wet saw and clinker. I do many mosiac tiles and I don't see how somebody could cut those tiny tiles with a grinder or even a clinker in most cases.

Here is a quick vid of a strait cut in some Dal porcelain (Fairly brittle) the quality of cut is about the same as with a small wetsaw you can use a wood strait edge or just draw a line. I happen to be using a segmented blade right now (it was on sale:thumbsup: ) a turbo, if it is not a new (as opposed to one that has been broken in) Bosch air flow, will cut just a tiny bit smother! Many of my sets involve exposed curve and radius work so I have become ONE with the grinder:chinese:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxtpBgX1XA4

PLEASE EMBED THIS FOR ME AS I AM TOO DUMB TO DO IT MY SELF

Thanks Craig
 

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Tile lady

You are just right about the time it takes to make a strait cut with a grinder. I made the video Just to answer your question;)

"Can you post a picture?
I just can't imagine getting nice clean straight cuts with a grinder."

I would never use it to make a simple strait cut, unless I had no other option, .....but if I needed to cut One outside corner "L" that would be the method i would most likely use.

As to using a clinker for mosaic... the way your breaker works would be the determining factor (old style rubi:no: Sigma and it's clones:clap:).
Craig
 

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They even make a tile break for natural stone cut on the 45(at least that's what the sales rep for "florida tile" told me). tile break the straight cuts, angle grind the others. wet saw what those won't do. with cheap ceramic you can even use the break for two point cuts (like door jambs) takes about twenty cuts to get the tools down but worth the time to learn. i have the lowes 99 dollar tile break and have done 15000+ feet with it but i want a better one. angle grinders cut better circles, faster than a wet saw. breaks cut up to schuter tile edge so clean and straight it looks factory. just can't say enough about that combo.
 

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Grand Rapids Remodeling
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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
I watched the video and maybe this guy is slow, but it looks like it takes way too long to do a straight cut. And too must dust as well. My clinker would do it in about 5 seconds.

As the poster said a grinder is never used for a straight cut. The advantage is the proximity of the tool to your work. The Sigma or whatever brand you prefer is in the same room right next to where your currently working with no set up time and no mist. I personally looked into alternatives when I had a upstairs bathroom job, in the winter and the HO would not let us set up the tile saw inside. Every cut was a walk downstairs and out in the snow and back. You have stated that you always have been able to set up close to your work, that's great but sooner or later you're going to run into a situation like I described. Even if you are able to set up in the next room a guy (or girl) can snap and crack a straight cut before you even make it to the saw. A grinder may take more time on a double cut (I'm not convinced of that) but factor in the walk to the saw and back and include set up and break down. Also if your outside in the winter include the time to clean up your tracks at end of shift.
 

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Tiling & Bath Contractor
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270 Posts
Well I have an enclosed heated trailer so cutting outside is not a problem for me. I do what I have to. Grinders make way too much dust and noise and I'd never use it in a customers house if I don't have to.

Different strokes for different folks. Nuff said.

I watched the video and maybe this guy is slow, but it looks like it takes way too long to do a straight cut. And too must dust as well. My clinker would do it in about 5 seconds.

As the poster said a grinder is never used for a straight cut. The advantage is the proximity of the tool to your work. The Sigma or whatever brand you prefer is in the same room right next to where your currently working with no set up time and no mist. I personally looked into alternatives when I had a upstairs bathroom job, in the winter and the HO would not let us set up the tile saw inside. Every cut was a walk downstairs and out in the snow and back. You have stated that you always have been able to set up close to your work, that's great but sooner or later you're going to run into a situation like I described. Even if you are able to set up in the next room a guy (or girl) can snap and crack a straight cut before you even make it to the saw. A grinder may take more time on a double cut (I'm not convinced of that) but factor in the walk to the saw and back and include set up and break down. Also if your outside in the winter include the time to clean up your tracks at end of shift.
 

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Yeah, Kinda had one too many Glasses of the GREEN Kool-Aid:thumbup:
Craig
 
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