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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
was asked a while back on these, so i figured I'd show.

a wood beam held up by 1x4's at the desired height
Wall Brickwork Property Brick Wood


The back side view
Wall Property House Room Building



Wall Brickwork Room Wood Beam

A segment of the backside of the brick is cut out for rebar placement in a cement mortar.
Tomorrow i will take down the form and clean the brick
Wall Beam Wood Reinforced concrete Architecture
 

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was asked a while back on these, so i figured I'd show.

a wood beam held up by 1x4's at the desired height

The back side view

A segment of the backside of the brick is cut out for rebar placement in a cement mortar.
Tomorrow i will take down the form and clean the brick
The arch bricks look a little proud of the string. How do you deal with that?
 

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Have Trowel, Do travel
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Metro M & L said:
The arch bricks look a little proud of the string. How do you deal with that?
Trim it when set with a angle grinder
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
the windows and doors sit behind the brick, and the angle iron is ugly.
you see masonry all the way around the opening, As it SHOULD be
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i am not the Architect, though i do insist on granite, its a hellalot easier.
I like working stone.

"make it as cheap as you can, making it look good"

its the same old song and dance
 

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I know this works as you have been doing this for a long time, but im wondering if the brick would simply not just crack and pop should an event occur where the structure should need to rely on the grouted cell. In ordinary conditions the brick would stay up with just friction bond a lintel isnt even required, in normal conditions.

I think a bolt-on on steel plate to the back might be a better solution, for the long term, 100 plus years.

Thoughts?

Other then that im just thinking out loud as that goes against everything I thought I knew.
 

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Wouldn't it be easier to notch the top of the brick. Forming a bond beam brick so to speak. This would make a less visible version of a suspended (hidden) lintel. That would make bonding rebar mortar,cement fill fully much easier?
 

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Angles are nothing but a maintenance issue,they rust,are unsightly and eventually cause cracking of adjacent masonry and need to be changed.

The stone or what he is doing will last as long as the building stands.
Go galvanized never seen one rust? GC. on a job over ordered lentils. I was given them since that day 15+ years ago they have set exposed to elements. They look as good now as the day I brought them home.
 

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Still won't last 100 years. When people see the cost of redoing doors and windows once rusting and cracking has started, they just tear down the building. Cheap to avoid it when you first build, $$$ later.
Never implied galvanized lintel lasting 100 years. Not going to jack this thread another time. I will however stand tall that it will never rust and so on versus a untreated steel lintel. I must conclude that the wall ties most use will also not last 100 years?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I know this works as you have been doing this for a long time, but im wondering if the brick would simply not just crack and pop should an event occur where the structure should need to rely on the grouted cell. In ordinary conditions the brick would stay up with just friction bond a lintel isnt even required, in normal conditions.

I think a bolt-on on steel plate to the back might be a better solution, for the long term, 100 plus years.

Thoughts?

Other then that im just thinking out loud as that goes against everything I thought I knew.
they take a beating, The Archies here basically dont want to see steel as a lintel.
stone, brick, and even old wood beams are the normal.

The brick will stay up without no support, and most will use wire in the joints as support.
This is how I do them and the engineers love seeing rebar in openings.

I have done 30ft long openings with this method, by arching the rebar in the back of the brick, As like an arch.
Usually I will put a 8mm rebar and a 12mm, dont ask me why I use 2 differ sizes. for wider openings i up it to a 12mm and a 16mm.
 
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Never implied galvanized lintel lasting 100 years. Not going to jack this thread another time. I will however stand tall that it will never rust and so on versus a untreated steel lintel. I must conclude that the wall ties most use will also not last 100 years?

It is better only in a general way than carbon steel, but galvanized can and does corrode. Too many variables to say exactly how long it takes though.

I like this method as an option over angle iron...always hate seeing that.
 

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Have laid up vertically these bricks on mortar boards,placed vertical rods and grout. When set had ready made lintels. Largest I set was around 10 feet.


In 1992 General Shale Products corp. introduced their SUPERKING brick. The dimensions were 4.5/8" x 2.3/4/ x 9.5/8 width, height length respectively. Those brick had two large core holes approx. 2.3/4" square. Built several buildings with them,did the same thing,laid brick up vertically,rebar and grout,had ready made lintels.


Here is a connection to a article depicting what I mentioned,only it is not the SUPERKING brick. They were made by Denver brick if I recall.


http://www.masonrytech.com/reinforcedbrickarticle.pdf
 
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