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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I'm new to the forum. I have over 12 years experience in the hardwood flooring industry. I have worked in many different situations, old and new as well as commercial. As far as the commercial goes, I have worked fraternity and sororities as well has college campuses. I do mostly residential remodel type work and a few new construction homes.

Beyond my 12 years in the flooring industry, I have been around residential construction for most of my life. I have seen homes built from the initial clearing of the land to the septics and basements as well as the concrete and finish work on the homes. I have even been a roofer and even had my hands on a little tuck-point. I have drywalled and even smooth-wall plastered.

So, I know how a house works. Blablabla right? Just introducing myself. Hope to add to the knowledge base here.

~~Jeff of Hardwood Floors Exclusive
Pacific Northwest
 

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Welcome!

I am looking forward to hearing your hardwood expertise
 

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hey newbie

1. If installing 3/4" oak hardwood floors on top of concrete, should I 1st install a plywood subfloor over the concrete and then nail the floor to the plywood or should I just glue/cement the flooring over the concrete itself.

2. What do u think about english white pine extra wide planks(some planks as wide as 14") as far as installation( glue or nail) and durability ?

Thanks in advance

Ed
 

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nova said:
1. If installing 3/4" oak hardwood floors on top of concrete, should I 1st install a plywood subfloor over the concrete and then nail the floor to the plywood or should I just glue/cement the flooring over the concrete itself.

2. What do u think about english white pine extra wide planks(some planks as wide as 14") as far as installation( glue or nail) and durability ?

Thanks in advance

Ed
Yes install plywood if its regular solid strip flooring. The other alternative is gluing down "shorts". All of these boards are short and stay nice and straight.

The wide planks of pine should be "face nailed" from the top and put pegs over the nails, or trim screw would work as well. Dont glue that. :Thumbs:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
1. If installing 3/4" oak hardwood floors on top of concrete, should I 1st install a plywood subfloor over the concrete and then nail the floor to the plywood or should I just glue/cement the flooring over the concrete itself.
1st question I have for you is "Above grade or below grade?"

2nd never, as a rule of thumb, glue solid strip or plank flooring directly to concrete.

If you are above grade you can do a really fun floating floor. Here is how:

1. Make sure plywood is filled and flat and all leaks found and stopped.
2. Install 15lb felt vapor barrier
3. 1/4 inch cork wall to wall
4. 2 staggered layers of 1/2 plywood screwed and glued together (roll carpenters glue every square inch of plywood.

After moisture in the plywood reaches proper measurements for your area, start nailing down your wood. The whole floor becomes a floating floor right over the concrete. There is no need for nailing to the slab.

Oh, slab must be moisture checked. I would never install pine, fir, maple, or hickory, or any light colored wood over a slab...especially if the slabe is not heated. And I would never use any wood over 3 inches over slab. And, if I had the option, I would only use rift or quartered over slab using the above floating floor system.

Now, go out and make money...I'll expect my cut when you're done. ;)
 

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thanks donedat, but would'nt it be easier and cheaper to put down only one layer of plywood. it just seems that it would be too costly for the materials(2 layers of plywood, cork, felt vapor barrier) and the labor to install it. I need to cut down on costs otherwise I can't give u your "cut" lol

Ed

Donedat said:
1st question I have for you is "Above grade or below grade?"

2nd never, as a rule of thumb, glue solid strip or plank flooring directly to concrete.

If you are above grade you can do a really fun floating floor. Here is how:

1. Make sure plywood is filled and flat and all leaks found and stopped.
2. Install 15lb felt vapor barrier
3. 1/4 inch cork wall to wall
4. 2 staggered layers of 1/2 plywood screwed and glued together (roll carpenters glue every square inch of plywood.

After moisture in the plywood reaches proper measurements for your area, start nailing down your wood. The whole floor becomes a floating floor right over the concrete. There is no need for nailing to the slab.

Oh, slab must be moisture checked. I would never install pine, fir, maple, or hickory, or any light colored wood over a slab...especially if the slabe is not heated. And I would never use any wood over 3 inches over slab. And, if I had the option, I would only use rift or quartered over slab using the above floating floor system.

Now, go out and make money...I'll expect my cut when you're done. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I have done it both ways. Nailing down to 3/4 over slab is pretty hard. 2 layers of 1/2" over 1/4" cork makes nailing easier, especially areas where you have to face nail. When you nail it to the slab, there is more chance of moisture transfer to your finish flooring, i.e. moisture traveling up the nails to the plywood and sometimes into your wood flooring.

Oh, the cork is for a sound barrier, so, when you walk on it, it does make a loud tapping sound.
 

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Donedat said:
1st question I have for you is "Above grade or below grade?"

2nd never, as a rule of thumb, glue solid strip or plank flooring directly to concrete.

If you are above grade you can do a really fun floating floor. Here is how:

1. Make sure plywood is filled and flat and all leaks found and stopped.
2. Install 15lb felt vapor barrier
3. 1/4 inch cork wall to wall
4. 2 staggered layers of 1/2 plywood screwed and glued together (roll carpenters glue every square inch of plywood.

After moisture in the plywood reaches proper measurements for your area, start nailing down your wood. The whole floor becomes a floating floor right over the concrete. There is no need for nailing to the slab.

Oh, slab must be moisture checked. I would never install pine, fir, maple, or hickory, or any light colored wood over a slab...especially if the slabe is not heated. And I would never use any wood over 3 inches over slab. And, if I had the option, I would only use rift or quartered over slab using the above floating floor system.

Now, go out and make money...I'll expect my cut when you're done. ;)
I wonder if the budget is an issue?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It is actually pretty hard to give specifics without seeing the job...so how about a plane ticket, hotel, rental car and consulting fee??? ;) :D :cool:
 
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