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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently still trying to sprout into the contracting business on my own.
I'm learning more and more, even though i haven't really made much progress and the job market right now is really kinda rotten.
But I had a question.
Once I give someone a price.
And they give me the job.
What kind of paperwork will i have to make sure i fill out?
AKA Contracting.
Is there a contract i should really make sure i fill out?
Who provides it? Me or them?
I just want to know the whole process so i don't get made a fool of.
I appreciate the advice. Thanks.
 

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:shutup: I can't really say what I want to say after reading your post so I will just say....YOU ARE NOT READY!!!

Go work for someone else for a while and learn at their expense or you will only be hurting yourself, your family, and most importantly YOUR CLIENTS. :censored::censored::censored:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
hahaha.
I know how to do my jobs.
It's the act of actually contracting im not familiar with.
I am a subcontractor and have been doing this for years.
However I'm not sure if there's anything i don't know that i need to do once i get the job.
I'm talking about the paperwork only.
the business aspect i guess.
 

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You should have them sign a contract that you furnish. This contract should spell out everything including your scope of work for the job, the amount of money, the terms and anything else to do with the job.

They sign it, return it to you, you sign it and return their copy to them.

Is this a commercial job?
 

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You should have them sign a contract that you furnish. This contract should spell out everything including your scope of work for the job, the amount of money, the terms and anything else to do with the job.

They sign it, return it to you, you sign it and return their copy to them.

Is this a commercial job?
He lists "suspended ceiling" under his trade, so it sounds like he'll be doing commercial work. That said, unless he's working for an owner directly, the chances of getting to have the GC sign his contract are pretty slim- any commercial GC worth 2 cents has a standard subcontract that all his subs sign.
 

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Contracts are only a part of the "business end". To me it sounds like he is asking about all aspects, contracts, licenses, insurance, accounting, etc. If he doesn't even know who is writing the contract, there is no way he is ready with the rest of this that is why I said you are not ready. Knowing how to install the ceiling does not make you a subcontractor. If you don't know the business end, you will get burned. I'm not trying to be an A$$, I'm trying to give you sound advice. Learn the business end from others before going out on your own.

To expand on Bob's point, if you are talking about new commercial construction the GC will issue the contract based on your proposal. But you still must write the proposal. Often times it's a standard subcontractor agreement - AIA documents or similar.

If you are replacing an existing drop ceiling in an existing commercial building, I would guess that it may be 50/50 on either you providing it or the owner/tenant providing it depending on the size of the building. Again if you are working for a GC he will likely provide it but you need to write the proposal with all you have spec'd.

If it's residential, I would say you would usually be providing it unless again you are working for a GC.
 

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Sean
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Thinking of leaving the nest: http://www.contractortalk.com/f16/i-am-just-starting-59111/
Learning Pricing: http://www.contractortalk.com/f14/bit-help-61857/
And now.... contracts

Paperwork required - well that depends on your state, down here we can still work off a handshake (not recommended), in PA it requires about a 5 page document at minimum as I recall reading

A few quick pointers - Location, location, location - put it in your profile & an intro would be cool. The first one will definitely help with you getting answers relative to your area, there are huge differences between, FL, CA, CT, AZ, AL, etc...

Are you licensed, most states have a business portion that you must take which includes specific contract language you must use, liens, etc... Check out Score, SBA, local Chamber of Commerce

Read at least 5 different topics in the business section of this site a day starting with the stickies.

As for the name - does it stand for "Not a Florida Craigslister" or "Nautical Florida Craigslister" or something else
 
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