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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
I'm working on a kitchen at present. I spent today ripping out all the old tile. I'm wondering if I can install the new tiles on top of the old mortar or if I should remove the old mortar?

The Floor is concrete with thick mortar, previously laid. If not recommended to install tiles over old mortar. what is the quickest way to remove the old mortar?

Thanks in advance
TJ
 

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Hello all,
I'm working on a kitchen at present. I spent today ripping out all the old tile. I'm wondering if I can install the new tiles on top of the old mortar or if I should remove the old mortar?

The Floor is concrete with thick mortar, previously laid. If not recommended to install tiles over old mortar. what is the quickest way to remove the old mortar?

Thanks in advance
TJ
TJ,

First, you should take a few minutes and introduce yourself here:
http://www.contractortalk.com/f44/
Tell us what your trade is and what location you are from. It can help with many things.

Second, I won't go into detail until we know you are in fact a contractor and not someone just lurking in here. In short, the answer is no, you cannot. If you get a copy of the TCNA handbook, all your basic tiling answers will be in there. As a (alleged) GC, shouldn't your tile guy know the answers too?
 

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The Floor is concrete with thick mortar, previously laid. If not recommended to install tiles over old mortar. what is the quickest way to remove the old mortar?
The process is called scarifying. You can rent large machines. I don't normally work with such big projects so I have this combo:



Works great AND keeps dust to a minimum! :thumbup:

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
My apologies for not introducing myself! I have done that now. I'm just starting to get my business going. As a young adult I used to assist my father in flooring, painting, minor plumbing and repairs. In the last 5 years I have been working under other people. I have just recently started taking on my own minor jobs for my wife's friends at present (hoping to expand thru word of mouth though :)

I will look into getting a copy of the TCNA. In answer to your question... I'm basically the tile guy, painter, floor layer.... so I don't know the answer. Hoping someone with more knowledge and experience can help me out.

Thanks in advance
TJ
 

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TJ,

Your question was pretty basic which would lead me to believe you're pretty new to tiling or no one has ever formally trained you. Some advice, read, read, read the tiling section. Tile is not rocket science but you must know what you're doing. Get yourself a copy of the TCNA handbook and become familiar with it. It will save your installs and make you a better tile setter!

http://www.tileusa.com/publication_main.htm

Welcome!
 

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TJ,

Usually not recommended to tile over old mortar mainly because you can't be really sure how well the old mortar is adhered to the floor and it is possible to not achieve a great bond with the old mortar. If you feel good about it then go ahead and do it but remember it is your reputation on the line. Maybe it would turn out fine and maybe you would have issues with it down the road. I wouldn't want to chance it and would take it up with a scarifier or chisel on the end of my rotohammer.
 

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I would also encourage you to Continue to ask questions here. You have let folks know you are new to this. Some folk will rip you for "stupid" questions but that is how we all learn. I cannot tell you how important it is to READ about your Craft From the Right Sources...... Angus mentioned the Tile Counsel of North America hand book for Tile-setters. this is the Bible of our trade know it chapter and verse and it will help you.
1 you won't do sets you shouldn't with out proper wavers
2 you will know the "industry standard" for most situations.
3 you will be able to "defend" your methods when someone bitches
4 you will be able to educate your client (be they homeowner or general contractor) as to the best method.... and more importantly Why certain costly preparations must be in place BEFORE you can Tile
5 you will be seen by your peers and clients as a PROFESSIONAL and they will defer to your judgment in such matters.


As a remodeler there are several trades you must master in the same way as you become adept in more areas you become more valuable as a craftsman.

Good luck and be passionate about what you do.
Craig
 

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The process is called scarifying. You can rent large machines. I don't normally work with such big projects so I have this combo:



Works great AND keeps dust to a minimum! :thumbup:
Angus how do you like your Bosch?

I had a Flex and 2 or 3 years ago switched to Hilti DCG 500 with dust cover it total'd out to $330 and is convertible to a regular grinder.


I have often wondered about the Bosch.

I think the cleansweep vac with the new power management circuit is a great addition to an already good vac
I ended up saving a couple $$ and got an Attix 8 http://www.industrialvacs.com/Attix_8_AS_E_Super_Quiet_Wet_Dry_Vacuum_p/302000414.htm
Craig
 

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Angus how do you like your Bosch?
Well I did it kind of backwards. I got a great deal on a used Bosch vacuum so by default, I bought the Bosch grinder. I like it. Or I should say it doesn't suck. I don't really have anything to compare it to. My neighbor does epoxy garage floors and he owns 2 of them to grinder the crap off concrete floors. I figure with the abuse he puts his through, I should be fine for the limited times I need mine.

I like the convertible feature of yours. That would be nice to have 1 tool instead carrying around 2! :thumbup:
 
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