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I am looking for a particular type of pressure washer but cannot seem to find one. The one I had recently starting giving out so, I decided to upgrade hopefully you all can offer some help. What I need is a pressure washer that does not need an outlet to run or a direct water supply. I would like to just show up and be ready to go. Preferably a small to medium pressure washer with a tank that can be left inside the van while I bring out the pressure washer.
 

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Mickey
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All you need is a gas powered washer and a big tank with a hose connecting the two. Don't know what you plan to wash but if you have a 2.5 gallon per minute pump then a 250 gallon tank full of water is going to last you about an hour and a half.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
All you need is a gas powered washer and a big tank with a hose connecting the two. Don't know what you plan to wash but if you have a 2.5 gallon per minute pump then a 250 gallon tank full of water is going to last you about an hour and a half.
Would you mind showing a sample type? I have found some but they seem to have so many extra things, I need it to be as plain as possible. If it matters it would not be doing heavy washing just residential play grounds and lawn furniture.
 

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Delco.com Larry at 1.800.433.2113 I have dealt with them for several years and been pleased with the service. Don't talk to Jerry, just ask for Larry.
 

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Head Grunt
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All you need is a gas powered washer and a big tank with a hose connecting the two. Don't know what you plan to wash but if you have a 2.5 gallon per minute pump then a 250 gallon tank full of water is going to last you about an hour and a half.
X2, i have thought of doing this same thing. I have seen setups in the past online here and there where the fella put a 250 or 500 gallon tank on a 16' utility trailer with a low pressure pump to feed the pressure washer. You could run the small water pump off a small generator for filling the tank or draining it. I would also put a good filter on the tank output for sand/debris.
Another part of pressure washing you can get into that most folks dont do is headstones in cemetaries. Nice thing about a cemetary is that there is usually water already there. I charge $25-$50 depending on the size of the headstone. I dont alot of them but it is quick and easy work.
 

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Lots of good info above. I would add that a machine that will move at least 4 GPM is your best bet. With lower gallonage, you'd be spending more time on a given job, and "time is money." You can get by without monster pressure, but a good flow rate is an advantage.
Also, you probably won't need a pump to feed the washer from a tank, as long as it's plumbed properly. Put gravity to work for you. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks for the help guys. I was thinking theat perhaps more GPM would be better but, I woul dbe going from home to home. Would not the water run out too fast? I feel like I would be refilling often, having to look for a water source many times. It would work best if I had a bigger truck or a trailer but I drive a van.
 

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You will use as much water pushing 2.5 GPM for two hours, trying to get a job rinsed off, as you would flowing 5 GPM for one hour. As long as your van will handle the weight (remember 8 lbs./gallon for water), get as big a tank as possible, but allow some "wiggle room" for the washer and other equipment (house-washing solutions, etc.) so your rear wheelwells aren't rubbing on the tires. ;)
Look into one of the "leg tanks" that come in various sizes. Those tend to be less susceptible to having the water sloshing around inside when the tank isn't completely empty or completely full. (Some of that orange plastic mesh fence like you sometimes see around construction sites can act as a baffle when stuffed into a tank, too.)
Is there a municipal water system in your area, or is it all/mostly wells?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You will use as much water pushing 2.5 GPM for two hours, trying to get a job rinsed off, as you would flowing 5 GPM for one hour. As long as your van will handle the weight (remember 8 lbs./gallon for water), get as big a tank as possible, but allow some "wiggle room" for the washer and other equipment (house-washing solutions, etc.) so your rear wheelwells aren't rubbing on the tires. ;)
Look into one of the "leg tanks" that come in various sizes. Those tend to be less susceptible to having the water sloshing around inside when the tank isn't completely empty or completely full. (Some of that orange plastic mesh fence like you sometimes see around construction sites can act as a baffle when stuffed into a tank, too.)
Is there a municipal water system in your area, or is it all/mostly wells?
That was what I was thinking about. Last thing I want is for the van to crap out on me. I drive a chevy astro so, I do not think I can be carrying a 250 gallon tank. I used to use any water source I could find but I think business would be better if I actually used my own water.

I mostly wash lawn furniture some times trash cans, so would not 2.5 GPM be enough? They get about as dirty as trash cans mostly dirt/dust, some grime. I was thinking of getting a 150 gallon tank that can be tied down by straps and a new gas pressure washer. I might have to make extra drives to a car wash or a park to get the tank filled but, it being lawn furniture/cans it should not be to much. Otherwise I might have to get a bigger tank and haul it by a small trailer but, I would like that to be a last resort.
 

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That was what I was thinking about. Last thing I want is for the van to crap out on me. I drive a chevy astro so, I do not think I can be carrying a 250 gallon tank. I used to use any water source I could find but I think business would be better if I actually used my own water.
Yeah, a full 250-gallon IBC or "tote" would literally weigh a ton, not counting the container. It would have to be one "beefy" Astro to lug around that much water.
Bringing your own water does allow you a little more control over water quality, too. A lot of times it's just easier to hook up to the customer's water supply, as long as their system can continuously supply your washer. If not, then the tank is the way to go. Maybe you could charge a little more for it, especially if you're bringing softened water or something like that. ("Maverick's Spot-Free Power Washing")

I mostly wash lawn furniture some times trash cans, so would not 2.5 GPM be enough? They get about as dirty as trash cans mostly dirt/dust, some grime. I was thinking of getting a 150 gallon tank that can be tied down by straps and a new gas pressure washer. I might have to make extra drives to a car wash or a park to get the tank filled but, it being lawn furniture/cans it should not be to much.
Okay, but don't tick off the car wash owner or whoever might pay for the water at the park. That's why I asked about a municipal water system in your area. You can sometimes pay a town or water district to let you get water from one of their hydrants.
Some of the guys on the pwashing forums will hate me for saying this, but others will agree with me: You can start out with a 2.5 GPM machine, it'll just take you longer than one with more output would. But where you're just washing a fairly small area, and not an entire deck/house/pool/parking lot/whatever, it could work.
For the nasty trash cans, consider some chemicals. Let the chem do the work, then just rinse it off. Charge a fair price, but don't undersell your work. Getting the crud off something the first time will take more effort (and probably more chems), but if you can work out a deal to come back on a schedule and keep the items/site clean for a reduced price, that's good.
If this works out for you, maybe your business will grow into that trailer, a hot water machine, etc., etc.
Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
When washing small things like lawn furniture and trash cans, would the PSI not be a bit more important?I do not really need a large area to be covered at one time like a deck but need something that would remove dirt quickly.
 

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Oh, yeah, good pressure is handy for knocking dirt off, as long as you don't do damage to whatever you're cleaning. Adjust the pressure according to the job: a cement slab or some grubby trash cans can be very forgiving of high pressure. Some nice wooden lawn furniture will be happier if it has any dirt lifted off it by an "eco-friendly" soap and a gentle rinse, rather than having somebody cutting curlicues in the wood with a 0° tip. ;)

I'm sure you already know that stuff, as part of leaving the item looking nicer than when you started the job, but I had to mention it. Some guys have started out trying to do all the work with killer pressure, and then wondered why their customers weren't happy with the results. :sad:

More jobs in less time equals more buck$, as long as the quality is there.
 
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