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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to help out the tile setter in the bathroom for the floor install.
1 - vanity in before or after, It's an adjustable leg vanity, not a solid base with a clip on kicker on the front.

2- Door jamb in before or after. Tile will meet carpet in the threshhold.

Thanks for the help
 

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Tile Pro - Consulting
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I would always tile before the vanity regardless of the type.

I also agree that the jamb should/can be installed prior to setting the tiles, but not necessarily because I would stop the tiles under the closed door. I/we in this area do not normally treat the bathroom threshold the same as a bedroom threshold.

Traditionally bathroom doorways were ended with a marble threshold which was about 1/4" higher than the bathroom floor. Due to color matching considerations, many of us eliminate the marble and tile to the hall side of the jamb.

I doubt building inspectors care if the threshold is flat and not able to stop any water that may have flooded the bathroom. I believe that was one of the thoughts with the 'traditional' technique.

This is how I prefer to do a bathroom doorway.

Jaz
 

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Head Light Bulb Changer
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If I can lay the floor without vanity and trim I do. Just makes it easier. You don't need the jamb in first. You should know what the swing is beforehand. I break my transitions (say tile and carpet) under the center of the door, so when it's closed you don't see the other floor. If it's a CO, I usually break in center.
 

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I would always tile before the vanity regardless of the type.
Jaz
Even These??? They are such a total Pain in the hiney to make work once they are installed:censored::censored:

And you prefer to have tile in the other room instead of at the middle of the door when closed? Interesting that would not go well here in Omaha.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys
I will install the jamb but leave the casings off. Seems around here the latest style is stop for the door on the jamb is mitered at the bottom on a 45 reveal and approx 2" off the floor. Not actually resting on the finished floor.
 

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Tile Pro - Consulting
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Charimon, No problem that you got mixed up about whether the vanity goes on top of the floor and who said it.:thumbsup:

charimon said:
And you prefer to have tile in the other room instead of at the middle of the door when closed? Interesting that would not go well here in Omaha.
It's not in the other room. Of course, that's the right way to do it in parts of the country that typically use a marble threshold in the thresh.

Take another look at the pic I posted and imagine those 4.5" pieces of tile as being one slab of marble. That's the way it's done when you do a "real mud job". Remove the marble to redo the floor and you have to fill the gap. Even when the other flooring is being replaced, that is the way it's done when tile setters are involved here. DIY's can do whatever they like.

The "under-the closed-door" method is done for bedrooms where flooring is changed more often, liable to be different from the hall, and where the door is supposed to be closed. Also of course in open doorways and arches.

There's a component of regionalism to. I've seen the tiny 2" wide marble thresholds used in many southern states and also in commercial where steel jambs require a narrow strip because the bottom would have to be cut.

The other advantage is that a visitor can easily see which door is the bathroom when the door is closed and obviously occupied.

So, where in the US & Canada is the use of a marble threshold a common practice?

Jaz
 

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Jaz,

I think Aesthetically it looks better that the furthest point out I would accept is to outside edge of door. And the stair step pattern I don't like as well. That would be my personal preferences, which may be other homeowners as well. No question on your skills.
 

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Mike,

If the tiles ended in line with the outside edge of the closed door, you'd be able to see the end of the tiles from the hall. It would look like you meant to stop half way under the door, but goofed.

As for what you call "steps". Those are not steps. Steps are when someone offsets each tile about 6" +- and it keeps repeating. I just saw a floor like that and it didn't look so good to me either.

The way I set those tile is the correct way as now recommended by the TCNA to help minimize lippage caused by warpage which is common in large tiles. As you may recall, the recommendation is to off-set the tiles no more than 1/3. The old and still common 50% off-set running-bond is discouraged.

Jaz
 

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This is a step. It was a DIY'r and when I asked, he said he likes it just fine. :whistling

You have to be very careful with wood looking tiles. Unlike real hardwood, each piece is the same length, so you can't change it.

Jaz
 

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Head Light Bulb Changer
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The "under-the closed-door" method is done for bedrooms where flooring is changed more often
Hmm...Never heard of that. Maybe a Northern thing? Around here, and in other states I've worked in, including out west (Cali, Nevada, Arizona), floors always break in the middle of the door. Around here if you don't, you're coming back to fix it.

Interesting thought about knowing which one is the bathroom by seeing the tile protruding.
 

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Huh.....you've never seen a marble thresh the width of the wall? You've never seen bathroom doorways that look like this?

Jaz
 

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Yeah, I don't like those either, made of travertine though is a little more acceptable to me. I did like the thought of which room is the bathroom, especially when I'm working in their house opening bedroom doors, but after that I don't like it. I hate asking to use the restroom.
I don't like the Hollywood thresholds either you see in hotel room doorways.
 

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I agree, those 2" threshold don't look good, but they have to use a skinny one because the door jambs are usually steel.

The pic in #15 is the way most bathroom used to be done and many still are. The top of the marble is supposed to be 1/4" higher than the floor. But today people are more style conscience and the limited choice of colors has many of us skipping the marble altogether..

One reason some areas don't bother with the threshold is that it's more work to get and install them. They get broken very easily until installed.

Jaz
 

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I dont understand.If I am mistaken,please forgive me.You said you wanted to"help the tile setter".Well "I" am a tile setter.If someone were going to "help" me,That certainly does NOT mean to do a job entirely,not sure what you are doing,then having to solicit proper installation methods."where"is the tile setter?Is he on the job?Can you talk to him?My scenario of helping a tile setter would be:humping material in,mixing mud,running the saw,handing him shi% etc,etc.Nick
 

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.

The way I set those tile is the correct way as now recommended by the TCNA to help minimize lippage caused by warpage which is common in large tiles. As you may recall, the recommendation is to off-set the tiles no more than 1/3. The old and still common 50% off-set running-bond is discouraged.

Jaz
I think what Mike was commenting about was the pattern in the pic is 1/3 and back rather than 1/3, 1/3, 1/3, repeat. It looks out of balance in the pic.
 
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