Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Having a new 2 story home built, construction crew seems to have drug every piece of framing through the mud. Most all stud wall and ceiling joists covered in mud 1/16th the 3/8 inch thick. Flooring completely covered too. All electricals have been run, no insulation or sheetrock installed yet. I'm sure the builder plans to just over this all up yet i am worried about mold growth and dust filtration into the living spaces. You can't picture this but it is really bad, i'd be laughing if it wasn't my home....
Is there any building or environmental code addressing this situation?
What would be the best clean-up techniques?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,573 Posts
Mold is in the air, not just the mud. Is the framing exposed to the air? Oh no! Mold! Ahhh!!!

Seriously though mold spores are everywhere. It takes a damp enviroment for the mold to grow. If you don't believe me there are weather services that give you daily "mold and pollen counts" especially during allergy season.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,539 Posts
I wouldn't put up with a contractor disrespecting my new house like that. Your paying the man good money. I would definately straighten his but out. The bottom line is this. You give the man a inch and his going to take a mile. Let him no your not happy with the way things are going so far. :rolleyes: If I was building a new house I would be on the job site saying "thats not the way Tommy Silva and Norm Abrahams does it on this old house. I would be that contractors worst nightmare. :Thumbs:The bottom line is this. Any framing lumber should be stacked off the ground and have a tarp over it. It should not be sitting in the mud or dragged through the mud. Also make sure there using joist hangers on your new house. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
199 Posts
Hmmmm ... I see a lot of red flags here. If I was the H.O. I'd pay a retired carpender/contractor a couple of hundred bucks to hold my hand. Pride of workmanship shows.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
I would definitely be concered about future mold problems. If local code requires that you put visqueen over the studs after insulation and then you install Tyvek on the outside you are going to be locking any moisture inside the stud cavaties and you WILL have problems down the road. If it were me I would require that any excess mud be removed, the house thouroughly dried out with fans and all the studs and bays sprayed with bleach or X-14 to help kill the spores prior to wall cover.

Here in the Oregon I have taken on dozens of mold/rot repair over the past 2 years and all of them have been caused by improper drying and building techniques before covering the walls. I refurse to install visqueen over the inside of the studs, instead, once everthing has dried to below 17% I install kraft faced insulation which will meets vapor barrier requirements. I have also stopped using Tyvek which, in Oregon, has been shown to cause more problems than not. All of my buidlings are wrapped with Super Jumbo Tex 60 min building paper. And many of them are also using rain screen systems. Good luck with your new home.

Jason
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
Grumpy said:
I've never been on a new construction job site where I didn't get filthy with mud. Infact I used to keep a spare pair of boots in my truck just for these visits. Then I all but quit new construction.
It's difficult to have a good additude on a muddy site. It seems to be mentally taxing. I myself gave it up too for that very reason!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,716 Posts
Blderman, "And many of them are also using rain screen systems."

What's that? Rich.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
It's a siding method. The building is completely wrapped in paper/barrier, then 3" wide strips of 1/2" borate treated plywood are nailed over the studs and around all windows, corners etc. The siding is the installed over these strips and an insect screen is put in at the bottom of the siding and a vent at the top. The purpose is to allow air to circulate behind the siding and keep any moisture from getting trapped and thus degrading the structure. It's probably overkill, but with the amount of moisture problems we are having in Oregon homes and businesses it is a sound practice.


Jason
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top