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New flooring in Kitchen

4557 Views 16 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  adams,b
G
I am going to replace the flooring in my kitchen soon and was looking to get some advice...

What would add the most value for the cost on the home

Tile or Laminate

I would go with Hardwood, but I dont think it would raise the value vs cost in my neighborhood.

Looking for the best gain for my dollar.

JD
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It is rare that wood will not add value, but it can happen. Tile should add value too. Laminate won't do as much as wood or tile should, but it won't hurt it :)
G
homeowner

what is the best way to to clean my allock floor
With a terry cloth mop, and laminate flooring cleaner.
depends on what you are looking to do if you are just looking to sell your house and you are going to do the flooring yourself i would suggest you do tile floors. you can find some good deals for under a buck a foot. i just did ceramic tile for 60 cents a foot plus thinset and groutm i also got some sheets of 2x2 tiles and cut them down and did a border at the entry way and put the tiles diagonal inside. i did over 600 sq ft of tile for about 600 bucks, but it also depends on your skill and time. to have someone install it would be 2-4 bucks a foot to install
Laminate works for us.
This is an older pic, we now have an island/bar setup. Anyhow, the floor extens all the way to the living room.

very nice. I like the diagonal full backsplash too.
Things to consider for a floor in a kitchen -- water, water, and water. I never recommend wood floors of any type (solid or laminate) in a kitchen. Some laminates do have an activated glue on the edges that you wet as you install it and they claim it will keep water out. But... how many kids will have water fights in the kitchen with the new sprayer? I think tile in a kitchen is a must, but watch out for stone. Stone is porous and tomato sauce, wine, etc. will stain it if you don't seal it properly and often. Just make sure you prepared the subfloor before you install tile. I make sure the subfloor is at least 3/4" thick, then nail backerboard (1/4") every 6 inches on the entire floor. I use a mortar with a latex additive already in it, for a bit more flexibility in the mortar. Make sure to seal your grout before your first big cooking party.
I install wood in kitchens and bathrooms all the time. If you have a leak, a laminate floor will trap the moisture. You'll never know you had a leak until it's far too late. With a wood floor, at least you know you have a water issue soon after it starts.
You guys ever see this before?

Click on the View Moisture Test link towards the bottom of the page and tell me what you think. They will warranty any laminate installed on top of this from water caused damage.

http://mpglobalproducts.com/quietwalk/1intro.html#
You're leaving out some important things to consider: 1) Framing member size and spacing. 2) Material the subfloor is made of: Plywood is ok, particle board is NOT OK.

BTW, maybe I've just never read the right manufacturer's instructions, but all the ones I HAVE read say to screw the rock down with purpose made screws, not nail it. Nailing voids warranties. Also, I hope you don't mean JUST nail it down??? CBU should be set in thinset (unmodified) AND screwed down every 6 inches, trying to avoid the joists with the screws.
I make sure the subfloor is at least 3/4" thick, then nail backerboard (1/4") every 6 inches on the entire floor. I use a mortar with a latex additive already in it, for a bit more flexibility in the mortar. Make sure to seal your grout before your first big cooking party.
BTW,CBU,????.......Yes, you can nail it down with roofing nails. I like to set it in thin-set as well.
jproffer said:
You're leaving out some important things to consider: 1) Framing member size and spacing. 2) Material the subfloor is made of: Plywood is ok, particle board is NOT OK.

BTW, maybe I've just never read the right manufacturer's instructions, but all the ones I HAVE read say to screw the rock down with purpose made screws, not nail it. Nailing voids warranties. Also, I hope you don't mean JUST nail it down??? CBU should be set in thinset (unmodified) AND screwed down every 6 inches, trying to avoid the joists with the screws.
By The Way...Concrete Backer Units

I must have missed the part about roofing nails but if you say so:)

And not only do I LIKE to set it in thinset, it's required if you want to maintain your (or your customer's) warranty.
I went to a class when "Hardi backer" just came out and that rep didnt say you could not nail it. We nail it all the time, Its a lot easier to get the head flush. So every time your fighting a screw think about me. Oh we hadn't had a seconds problem with nailing it either.
Hardie's website list nail or screw down as acceptable. We always just screw it down because we use one of those Senco auto screw guns so it takes just minutes either way.
Attach Hardibacker cement board to framing
If required by local building codes, install a moisture barrier between studs and cement board.

Install sheets 1/4" above floor, tub or shower pan.

Fasten cement board with specified nails or screws (as listed in "Materials Required") a maximum of 8" around perimeter and all supporting studs.

Keep fasteners 3/8" from sheet edges and 2" in from sheet corners.

Set fastener heads flush with the surface, without overdriving.
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