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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, I've worked in the past as a high-end repaint contractor. The world of new construction painting is pretty foreign to me, but it's almost time to start painting my new house. I've opted to do it myself since I'm not happy with a standard one color, one sheen job. As of tomorrow, the walls and ceiling will be textured. The finish carpenter is scheduled to do the trim work on Monday. Ideally, I would want to get in and spray the PVA before the trimwork is installed, but that might not be possible due to my work schedule. My ceilings will be flat, trim work (crown, base, etc.) and doors will be semi, and my walls will mostly be satin. What seuence of events would you new construction guys suggest? Do you always PVA after the trim is installed? What order do you like to complete things in?

I plan to spray the trim with an oil primer, rather than latex. Everything else will be latex all the way. I would prefer to spray the ceilings, but the walls will be rolled. I usually use ICI or SW products. Though I have been know to use Behr enamel undercoaters and Premium Plus paints. I know that means I probably lose credibility with you folks, but I don't understand why you hate Behr so much. IMO, it covers extremely well and doesn't spatter at all. I thinks it's a solid paint for the price.
 

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There is a current thread in this vein, why not jump on in there?
BTW, welcome to the site.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had read the ceilings or crown thread, but I didn't feel like it really contained the info I was looking for. While the explanation of the process in that thread is very detailed, I know that his method places a much higher priority on speed than I plan to. I'm looking for the best way to get this done.

One of my concerns has to do with the order of trim installation vs prime and paint. To me it makes a lot more sense to PVA the ceilings and walls prior to the installation of the trim work, but that doesn't seem to be common practice. Am I the only one who thinks this way?
 

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The painters will be around shortly.
 

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Unfortunately I can't help much here. We don't do hardly any 'new const' type jobs, as it seems all the GC's are looking for is lowest price. The new const that we do take on, is for a couple high-end GC's that do remodels, and additions. And on these jobs, we pretty much get run of the place until we are done.

We DO prefer to get the primer on before the trim is up, but it doesn't always work that way. (We actually had to explain a couple times why a primer was even needed) It sounds like you won't have time to do it before the carpenter does install, so just figure on doing it afterwards.

And curious as to why you are going to spray especially on your own home. IMO spraying is just for application speed, it doesn't provide a better finish.

As for the Behr, well....if you are comfortable with it, so be it. If I was taught using it, I probably would have it mastered in applicating, and be happy.. But in my experiences with it, it didn't even come close to comparing with B.M. or S.W. top-line paints.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
The reason for spraying the primer is because of speed. The reason for spraying the trim is because of finish, especially since I'll be using latex. The final trim coat will be brushed, but SW ProClassic blends well enough that I'm not concerned about brush strokes. Wall and ceiling paint will be rolled.

Thanks for the help. I might see if the carpenter can just cut the molding and I'll put it up later. I have a finish nailer, so it won't take long.
 

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Pre-cut moulding???
 

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I do a lot of new construction and this is how i tackle it. Spray prime all the sheetrock before the house is trimmed, spray and back roll one finish coat on the ceiling. When the trim carpenters are finished i then fill all the nail holes with Zar filler and sand all the trim and pole sand the walls. After a thorough dusting i then prime all the trim with enamel underbody and then sand all the trim again with a fine paper, dust everything and the caulk. Before i start with the oil paint on the trim i tack cloth everything to make sure it is all free of dust, i apply both finish coats (sanding and tack cloth between coats) and then cut and roll the walls.
 

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Why not spray the walls before the trim is installed?

I prefer to mask and spray @ 200 sq ft per hour vs 75 sq ft cutting and rolling?

Peter
 

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Spray all walls with primer, prior to trim going on. Spray and backroll all ceilings. If room has crown, spray crown and then all trim. Spray ceiling paint through airless into a bucket. Get on your stilts or ladder and cut all ceilings to the crown. Brush and roll all walls. We did not tape off the base because the floor guys will for sure damage it. We will go back when they are finished and paint all newly installed shoe and paint all base with one final coat. We used S/W's new Duration Matte on all walls. I will never go back to any other paint again. This stuff is amazine. $26 a gallon for wall paint the you can't stain an you can touch-up anywhere with a brush- Amen to that!
Ceiling paint was Qualicote flat and trim is Cashmere Mid-Gloss- levels like an oil when sprayed.
5600 sq foot house is nearly complete with this method above with only about 300 man hours put in from start to now :Thumbs: - Thanks to Don!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the tips.

I wanted to get in and spray before the trim was installed, but my schedule just didn't allow it. I ended up finding enough time before they got there to use a mini roller to cut in around everywhere they were putting trim, then I went in afterwards and rolled it quickly with an 18" roller. It was really pretty fast.

At this point the only thing I plan to spray is the trim and door primer and paint. I was planning on using ProClassic for the trim. Why do you prefer Cashmere?
 

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jiriki, Because different colors are used in each room so it does not really warrant it, i also have to deal with other subs on site which is a pain.
 

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We use Cashmere(sp?) because it is easier to brush out if needed. There will always be areas that you can't spray. ProClassics is very hard to brush out. Try the Medium-Gloss and you will never go back to ProClassic again.
 
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