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Discussion Starter #1
We visited the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles. If you are ever in the area, stop in for a dose of near-forgotten history.
While you are at it, check out the floorcovering! The material appears to be the ends of 2x4s. Millions of them! It was installed 8 years ago(?) and it looks great. One employee said, "it doesn't get waxed, but it does get oiled." I didn't understand, but perhaps someone here can explain. I found one edge exposed and it appears to be solid, about 9/16" thick +/-, though I could not be sure.
Who has seen this before?
 

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Tile Contractor
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All the shop floors at my high school had that type of floor three hundred years ago.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So you go to a museum and all we get to see a picture of the floor?

Freak
HAHAA! I was lucky to get that much. Officially, photography is forbidden in that museum. I had to find an vacant area of the exhibit in which to capture these covert images. I guess they don't want anyone muscling in on their 'history documentation' gig. :rolleyes:
Also, it is hard to argue your assessment that I am a freak. Or, as I like to say, "A few planks short of a full box." :laughing:
 

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Tile Contractor
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Believe it or not I do sorta recall the thickness. I was a Vocational Electric Shop Major at the time and we frequently had assignments to install lathes and saws and drill presses and stuff.

I can remember the blocks being about 1-1/2" to 2" thick. They were on a concrete substrate and not adhered to the substrate. There was some type of very thick liquid material (possibly a rich varnish) used to pour and trowel over the blocks that would settle between them and harden. The wood shop guys did that part.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Believe it or not I do sorta recall the thickness. I was a Vocational Electric Shop Major at the time and we frequently had assignments to install lathes and saws and drill presses and stuff.

I can remember the blocks being about 1-1/2" to 2" thick. They were on a concrete substrate and not adhered to the substrate. There was some type of very thick liquid material (possibly a rich varnish) used to pour and trowel over the blocks that would settle between them and harden. The wood shop guys did that part.:)
Cool! Wow, that thick. And floating, no less. Very interesting.
Well, I am too curious to let it alone. I contacted this company and asked them to send me info and samples.
:detective:
 

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Tile Contractor
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I don't see what they are specing for a grouting product.:)
 

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Knowledge Factory
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End block flooring, has been around for ages. It is very expensive and very labor intensive, but it will take a beating, because of the strength in th fiber orientation. I have seen wood flour, and urethane used as a joint filler. There is also have rounds. Saw a bathroom floor where it was done with all different sizes of round ends, and urethaned. Very unique floor.
 

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Paul
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Very cool topic, thanks for sharing :thumbsup:


I'm a freak too....you have no idea how many times the wife and I have been watching a movie and she's into the plot saying "did you see that thing do that other thing..blah, blah, blah" and I'm like "Did you SEE THAT FLOOR".....and she's like :sad: :no: :laughing: "Freak"

:whistling:laughing:
 
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