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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A framer at a construction site wants to connect to the Temp. power pole to run his 120-volt air-compresor and lights but can only find a L6-30R availble. What I understand is that a L6-30 is a 240 volt connection only and that it isn't legal to connect to only one hot leg and the ground for 120-volts, which we know will work on a house panel since the neutral and ground conductors are bonded in the panel.
Does anyone know if this is permissable, especially if it is wired into a NEMA 3R or NEMA 4 box with GFCI protection?

Thanks

Deadshort
 

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DGR,IABD
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This is a NEC 110.3(b) violation, as well as a violation of major portions of article 250. Don't do it. What do you mean that this is all he can find? There's an electrical supply house within a short drive from almost anywhere. Something's not adding up here. Why wouldn't he just plug up his gear into the regular receptacles that are on every T pole?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought so

I don't work contruction sites, my brother in law does and he wanted to try this and I didn't think it would work. Since the ground conductor will be used as a current carrying conductor(neutral) there wouldn't be a real ground; not to mention the code violation.

The problem he is having is finding and open 120-volt outlet. Too many people are using "Y"'s from the same source, running multiple air compresors and lights and etc causing the breaker to trip or air compressors to "bog-down".

I think he needs to take this up with the site manager/foreman.
 

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DGR,IABD
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DeadShort said:
I think he needs to take this up with the site manager/foreman.
That would be the wise move. OR... he can fire up the loudest, most obnoxious generator he can borrow right next to the house. They might get the point. I do understand his dilema, however. When I put in a T-pole, I put in 4 quads on 4 circuits. I almost never build one with a 220 receptacle on a resi job, unless there's a special request. It's no biggie either way. I know that some of the big hardwood floor sander guys need 220 for the sanders. I have one contractor that I only put a big NEMA 14-50 receptacle. He has a panel made up with a 14-50 cord and plug on it that he takes in and out of the job trailer each day he's working. It's funny sometimes to see a development where only a few sites have t-poles and there's tons of cords criss-crossing the streets and going from yard to yard. I guess that falls into the "do what you gotta do" category.

Dead Short, respectfully (and I mean it), why didn't you know the answer to this already? I know that CA has only been licensing electricians on a statewide basis for a couple of years now, but this is a pretty fundamental question. I was just wondering if perhaps you were a factory or maintenance electrician? Some electrical trade niches sort of keep you isolated from the rest of the electrical world.
 

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Electrical Contractor
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Mark, I'll have to agree with your very well worded last paragraph. This sentence is what concerns me:
connect to only one hot leg and the ground for 120-volts, which we know will work on a house panel since the neutral and ground conductors are bonded in the panel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'm a field technician. Most of what I see is industrial and large commercial. 240, 208, and 480 3-ph. Troubleshooting power supplies is my specialty. I do hold a C10 license and only use it for side work.
 
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