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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing a exterior painting project on a home that was built in 1995. I'm also going to repair the bases at the bottom of two columns in the entry way.
I dug into one of the bases today and the 4"x 4" post seems to be fine. But all of the wood framing and plywood are pretty much gone from termite damage. I'm wanting to try and keep the bottom plate from sitting directly on the concrete slab.
My question is, has anyone tried putting a piece of composite decking or fascia under the pressure treated bottom plate?
Or does anyone have any other way's to approach this?
The H/O is fine with me framing it out how it was before.
 

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General Contractor
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Paul, try to leave vents at the top of the column and bottom for air circulation so the moisture won't get trapped inside... this way you will never have any issues down the road.
 

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Paul, yes. I've built columns with pvc block spacers under the 2x4 bottom plate. 3-1/4'' Tapcons. Keep plywood and lathe off concrete. Or 20ga. studs, cement board and bead. Stucco away.

Greg, I've seen vents up North on wood columns but never here with lathe and stucco. Not that it would be a bad idea.

And always wondered how long those wood and lathe bases on grade would last. :glare:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Well, I ended up totally rebuilding both of the column bases. The right side column base was in worse shape then the left one.:rolleyes:
I did suggest to the homeowners about using block. But they wanted it rebuilt with PT 2'x4's, since the original bases had lasted 20 years and they were going to be selling their house sometime soon.
So here was my process:
I re-framed w/ PT and used plywood (keeping it up off of the concrete).

After re-framing and adding the new plywood. I added two layers of tar paper, vinyl corner bead and screed bead before attaching the wire lathe.

Scratch coat.



After I got the left column base scratched in, it was time to tear into the right side and get it to the scratched in point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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Turned out nice Mix, I just put a "Band-Aid" on a very similar fix on a place today, with some "textured caulk". I'm putting off what you just did!! But I gotta say, I was looking for the tiles, with the grout gloves and Grout float doing the brown coat...:whistling
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Turned out nice Mix, I just put a "Band-Aid" on a very similar fix on a place today, with some "textured caulk". I'm putting off what you just did!! But I gotta say, I was looking for the tiles, with the grout gloves and Grout float doing the brown coat...:whistling
Thanks TA. :thumbup:
I alway's wear gloves when doing stucco work. The lime dries out my hands if I don't. As for the float, it's a green stucco float. Grout floats are much more dense. :thumbsup:
 

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Kowboy
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Paul:

It looks nice, but isn't it hard to charge enough to cover the work on such a small job? You've got to get out the same tools to do 8SF as you do 800 and clean 'em up when you're done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Paul:

It looks nice, but isn't it hard to charge enough to cover the work on such a small job? You've got to get out the same tools to do 8SF as you do 800 and clean 'em up when you're done.
Thanks Kowboy. :thumbup:
The only way I do these type of stucco repairs is by time + materials. I think this way is fair to both the customer and myself. :thumbsup:
 

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Looks great Paul.

FYI, the green float is basically a sponge attached to a float handle. I usually use a wood float for the brown coat because it makes it coarser. In between the two in coarseness is the brown rubber float, but I don't use that one as much.

Paul:

It looks nice, but isn't it hard to charge enough to cover the work on such a small job? You've got to get out the same tools to do 8SF as you do 800 and clean 'em up when you're done.
Tell me about it, this kind of thing is basically all I do.
 
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