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We are building some window shutters for a repeat customer and they have several arched windows... We are considering building the sunburst style plantation shutters. I can't wrap my head around how to make them operable. I understand how the mock style works but these will not work for our situation... The arched windows are very high up, around 16' to the bottom of the arched window, so access is a problem as well. I am really stumped here an would really appreciate some guidance.

The house is in Edmonton Alberta Canada so the the climate goes from far below freezing to hot enough to get a real nice sunburn so I am concerned about expansion and contraction.
How much of a float is necessary to accomodate the expansion and contraction?
Would MDF be okay or should we go with real wood?
 

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yea that's kind of long for unsupported pvc imo
unless maybe you break up the shutter into several sections,plus if they are going to be painted a dark color that could pose a set of problems with using pvc

Spanish cedar or cypress or maybe even clear heart redwood are probable better choices,still these are super big shutters,maybe worth it to have someone work up specs and drawing for you

google shutter hardware there are some sites that have some of the more common mounting hardware,you could also have it custom made im sure
 

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ok, kind of late, but, what the heck- that far up would probably just opt for plantation shutters with contoured louvers , i.e. horizontal louvers that go into the arch (check out pic #34 in the Gallery), that way, the tiltrod would connect to all of the louvers right up the center and you could operate with an extension pole.

We use a cnc router to make all of our arched components so that they're perfect and the clearances of the louvers to the stiles are within 1/32". no problem with real wood down here in Texas' blazing heat, so wouldn't worry about expansion too much. We do give about a 1/4" clearance for the frame to fit into the window- especially with arches- assuming of course you're using a Z-type of frame which overlaps the wall or jamb.
 
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