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hi everyone. Im new here and i am looking for advice. I am a senior in college (business) who has an incredible passion for contruction and carpentry. I have no real experience, other than i am ahem....was good at woodworking in college. That aside, i just have a general knowledge of construction. I know without a lot of experience im limited, but is there a chance for me to be a contractor someday? how should i go about that? am i out of my league, or does my drive help at all. thanks a lot.-paul
 

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Dharma Building
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Welcome Porkchapes!?

My advice is go work for a contractor for a while. You may have to start as a carpenter's helper or general laborer, but if you are intelligent, dependable and work hard, you will rather quickly be given greater responsibility, as its hard to find good workers. After that, simply keep your eyes and ears open. Ask questions when you can. Observe other trades at work and learn what you can. Also, there are any number of courses and books available.

The hard part for many contractors is the business end of things, and you already have a head start over many of us in that regard. So, of course you can become a contractor. Go for it and good luck!
 

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porkchapes said:
hi everyone. Im new here and i am looking for advice. I am a senior in college (business) who has an incredible passion for contruction and carpentry. I have no real experience, other than i am ahem....was good at woodworking in college. That aside, i just have a general knowledge of construction. I know without a lot of experience im limited, but is there a chance for me to be a contractor someday? how should i go about that? am i out of my league, or does my drive help at all. thanks a lot.-paul




Craig said:
Welcome Porkchapes!?

My advice is go work for a contractor for a while. You may have to start as a carpenter's helper or general laborer, but if you are intelligent, dependable and work hard, you will rather quickly be given greater responsibility, as its hard to find good workers. After that, simply keep your eyes and ears open. Ask questions when you can. Observe other trades at work and learn what you can. Also, there are any number of courses and books available.

The hard part for many contractors is the business end of things, and you already have a head start over many of us in that regard. So, of course you can become a contractor. Go for it and good luck!


Craig in right. you need to get you feet wet and doggie paddle before you can swim. Just watch out for the sharks because you don't want to get bit. By sharks I mean all contractors are looking for loyal, dependable, intelligent, etc. people to work for them. The only problem is some mean well by what they might tell you and others just are out for themselves and might wind up minipulating you to get what they want. If you're lucky you will find someone that is genuine with theiir words. Don't let anyone take advantage of your eagarness. Be smart and learn what you can. For every job you do you will leave it with experience. Just build what you learn. Find better and faster ways of doing things your way to get the same end result. I've been in this business for about 15 years now. but, been doing it as a little boy. I still run across jobs that I learn things. Usually from the older houses. But, remember...Knowledge is power and power is strength. Most contractors think they can do anything and perhaps some can, but until you experience the knowledge first hand you'll never really know how to do it and do things the right way. Anyone can do anything but time is what it takes to do it right. With time comes knowledge...

Books can give you an idea of how to do things, but "hands on" tells you what the idea means and why it is the way it is.

Be patient
 

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Paul, go here http://www.nahb.org/ and look around. Locate your local chapter and contact them, many of the have earn while you learn programs in conjunction with community colleges. Shoot for a BA at least, you will need it in today's world.
Jump into your local builders assocn. with both feet. Join, attend the functions (most are really fun), if you ask, you will wind up with some mentors.
 
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