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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all.. due to some plumbing issues, we've recently been forced to change the floor in the kitchen of our nursing home.. Previously it was quarry tile, and now we are fairly set on an Epoxy finish so we can make it seamless.

My question is, what would be the best way to level the floor out? (currently it is bare concrete with remnants of thin set from tile and a couple recent concrete repairs). It will probably need a float of about 1/4" to 1" at the deepest point. The original floor (minus our repairs) is from the 60's and in good shape considering..

I've used self leveler before with excellent success, but that is under tiled floors with no more than 1/4" depth. I'm concerned about the overall strength of the float if we only use epoxy over the top. Grinding it smooth is not an option because it is needing to level with 2 floor accesses, and the adjoining rooms. can anyone recommend what
would work best in this scenario?
 

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I'm not a flooring guy, but a concrete guy

Floor levellers are generally stronger (more compressive strength) then the concrete they go over, but are not considered a wear surface for extended periods of time.

I use a product called Agillia Screed A, and another call Agillia Fina, not wear surfaces, but great levellers and some people want it as a finished floor...rule is use an epoxy coating to make that the wear surface.
 

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Are you hiring the Epoxy installer? That takes priority as to whatever floor prep needs to be done. What am I prepping for has been my question the past few days, we've removed carpet adhesive for a utility grade concrete stain, a bid on hardwood removal for travertine, how does the stone installer want the slab, we'll scrape the glue, anything else is additional.

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For an epoxy, it's usually a CSP 3 or higher, shotblasted or grinded, depending on what the finish floor manufacturer requires.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've gotten a ton of quotes, from self installable epoxy finishes that range from $1200-$5,500, and installed from $8000 - $18,500 (the total square footage is about 900 sq ft). We do need to have it approved by the health dept because it is considered a commercial kitchen. I do find it ironic that i've heard they will scrutinize the roughness of an epoxy finish, but tile with grout is still approved (and far easier for bacteria etc to exist).

We havent made a final decision on the finish, but being that we are not exactly a wealthy facility, cost plays a huge factor. $20+ a square foot is out of the question.

I was really hoping for a concrete guy to chime in, so thank you, i'll definitely check out the Agilla.. and yes, it is intended that the brunt of the actual wear will be handled by the epoxy (requiring periodic maintenance of course). I would just hate for a leveler to slide or chip in large pieces since pretty much everything we're working with is non-ideal ;)
 

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Are you hiring the Epoxy installer? That takes priority as to whatever floor prep needs to be done. What am I prepping for has been my question the past few days, we've removed carpet adhesive for a utility grade concrete stain, a bid on hardwood removal for travertine, how does the stone installer want the slab, we'll scrape the glue, anything else is additional.

For an epoxy, it's usually a CSP 3 or higher, shotblasted or grinded, depending on what the finish floor manufacturer requires.
Holy crap you did that all with a grinder?
 

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Yeah, I'm trying to forget about it, my elbows are still in pain.
Good choice on epoxy for kitchen, if it isn't done right you will have problems, and may have to pay again.
 

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Yeah, I'm trying to forget about it, my elbows are still in pain.
Good choice on epoxy for kitchen, if it isn't done right you will have problems, and may have to pay again.
Time for one of those lawn mower looking ones you can walk behind.
 

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Was it drain line replacement? Did they compact the soil, moisture barrier, dowel with rebar, cover with visqueen to help cure strength.
I don't see why you want a concrete guy, they are long gone by the time finish flooring issues need to be addressed, what you need is someone that specializes in floor prep, Ardex or Mapei self leveling products will work very well as long as they are installed correctly, is the slab contaminated with grease? Any contamination will interfere with bond, the #1 issue is "peeling" of epoxy, the prep is the vital link to longevity.
Will be faster and easier to maintain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
correct.. there was two drain lines we replaced, and in the process added 2 more drains to the floor and cleanouts to the end of both lines. We had to cut through concrete and rebar to get that replaced, then after putting it back, put the soil back, drilled in new rebar, and poured new concrete. The floor was completely previously covered in a fairly difficult to remove quarry tile, so i havent seen any grease/moisture issues in it.. but being that there is new concrete installed over the drains, we do need to wait for that area to cure.

i looked into the adrex a little and seems like a good product, but looks like it is only intended for a very thin resurfacing.. do you know if it can be built up a little thicker since i'll actually need about 1/4" - 1/2" total?
 

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Sounds like it was done correctly(concrete) I see a lot of skipped steps with the rebar/tieing in, if Ardex is readily available in your area they have various products past the 1"or two mark self leveler, the specs/steps are important not to skip with the dollar amount under the product.
 
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