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I've been painting for 15 years, but just started my own business @ a year ago. I still haven't totally figured out how to accurately and properly bid jobs. If I was to bid a job on an 1100 SF home, what is the going rate per SF? I've always bid by the hour but I have someone that wants a bid done based on SF and I have no idea what the going rate is per SF. Any advice would be much appreciated.
 

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I've been painting for 15 years, but just started my own business @ a year ago. I still haven't totally figured out how to accurately and properly bid jobs. If I was to bid a job on an 1100 SF home, what is the going rate per SF? I've always bid by the hour but I have someone that wants a bid done based on SF and I have no idea what the going rate is per SF. Any advice would be much appreciated.
Ask him his sq. ft. price to put up a house for you. What ever reason he has for not giving you a hard number tell him the same thing. It is your business bud the job how you feel most comfortable. If he needs a sq. ft. price he can do the math.

Jim
 

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Tell him that only applies to new construction for builders:whistling as for homeowners well that prices goes up to $3.25 sqft plus moving furniture and covering the flooring.etc.., This isn't let's make a deal! you need to cover your butt so if the guys is a bean counter just shoot him a price and make it high cause he will more then likely want you to come down.


www.frankawitz.net
 

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Pompass Ass
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I've been painting for 15 years, but just started my own business @ a year ago. I still haven't totally figured out how to accurately and properly bid jobs. If I was to bid a job on an 1100 SF home, what is the going rate per SF? I've always bid by the hour but I have someone that wants a bid done based on SF and I have no idea what the going rate is per SF. Any advice would be much appreciated.
If you have been painting for 15 years, I am sure you have done a similar job already, just figure how much you charged before and divide it by the square footage of the house.

You could also look at a bunch of your recent jobs that are similar, and figure the square footage price the same, way, you will probably find the smaller the job, the higher the square footage price will be.

Bidding jobs is more of an art than a science, there is no 1 way that is best, contracting would be a lot easier if someone gave us a price and we said yes we can do it or no we can't, we have to be able to make enough money to make a profit, but we also have to be in line with the other bids as well.

Once you develop a name, some people will call you and hire you because of your reputation and past work experience.
 

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here is a little help for you.


  1. you cant go off floor square footage unless you are only painting ceilings. you have to add the total wall square footage plus the ceilings to get the correct square footage of the area to be painted. rates vary from state to state - buy an estimating book if you have no idea
  2. Add the total number of doors at a per unit price
  3. Add the total linear feet of trim at a per linear foot price
  4. Add the total number of windows if applicable at a per unit price
  5. Add the total amount of prep (drywall/plaster repairs) at either a square footage price or a per man hour +material price
  6. Add the total amount of furniture you have to move if applicable at a per man hour price
  7. Add for caulk if needed
  8. the price also depends on the materials you are going to use - flat, egg-shell, semigloss, gloss - what quality promar400, 200, classic 99, superpaint, duration, etc.
  9. there are markups for colors - yellow and red don't cover
  10. Do you have to prime or spot prime?
  11. kitchens and baths take longer than bedrooms figure on that
  12. closets take time - are you emptying them out or is the homeowner
  13. are the ceilings textured?
That is all i can think of off the top of my head. if you don't take everything into consideration you will end up working for the same amount of money that you were making when you were working for someone but you will be putting in twice as many hours.

you have to add in the time it takes you to bid, market, and do administrative duties plus the cost of supplies for the office, internet, insurance, workers compensation, payroll taxes, unemployment etc.

just don't be one of those guys that works for wages for a couple years and takes work away from legitimate contractors. if you want help with your painting business join the PDCA. they freely exchange information like pricing, employee handbooks etc.

Good luck
 
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