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I have a partial pool deck that needs replacement. There are curves involved and I need and idea on how figure how much concrete is needed.

Thanks,

Dan
 

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I would suggest you stop by your nearest DIY store, Lowe's or Home Depot, and ask one of their "pros" how many bags of quikrete that would take.

Or, you could just call a REAL contractor.
 

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diplomat
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Figuring out the area with a curve is similar to figuring out the area with a triangle.
 

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Love me some Concrete
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LxW= area

Then figure how thick you want it....

Did you notice we have a DIY site?....:whistling:laughing:
Perfect, Griz, perfect!

Actually its quite simple:

Length x width x height / 3 and add 6.2 to get a rough layout and then take the remaining number, add 1.466 and then square root it. The resulting number is the radius of the very first curve. So do this for each little curve and then double it to make sure you have enough concrete because it evaporates as it dries.

Don't listen to the professional masons, they are just in it for the money and actually have no idea how to form, place, finish and seal concrete. Just look at any home owner perfection pour to validate my statement. There is absoultely nothing wrong with seeing a bunch of float lines all over the pad.:eek:
 

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Hey I did exactly what you said and I had 847 yards too many!. I ended up concreting the entire back yard.. up to the dog ears on the fence. ...
 

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Well ya all forgot about that pi~ things? 3.17 x whatever!! I do believe that will, and could help out! LOL
Speaking of pie, got a piece of 3 berry pie, with ice-cream waiting! blue/black/rasb.

SOOOO GOOD!
 

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Perfect, Griz, perfect!

Actually its quite simple:

Length x width x height / 3 and add 6.2 to get a rough layout and then take the remaining number, add 1.466 and then square root it. The resulting number is the radius of the very first curve. So do this for each little curve and then double it to make sure you have enough concrete because it evaporates as it dries.

Don't listen to the professional masons, they are just in it for the money and actually have no idea how to form, place, finish and seal concrete. Just look at any home owner perfection pour to validate my statement. There is absoultely nothing wrong with seeing a bunch of float lines all over the pad.:eek:
crap i have been doing it wrong, i have been useing length x width x depth, no wonder my crap is always low, thanks for the heads up:whistling
 

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I'm The BOSS
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You guys are jerks.
someone comes on here asking for help and all they get is a hard time.
That's not right, everyone need a little help.

Danbar: the average pool deck on a residential pool is approx. 750 yards of concrete.
don't do it by the bag , that's way to much work. Call your local concrete company ask for one truckload of 95k65 @ 8500 psi mix. that should work well for pools and the chemicals.
 

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You guys are jerks.
someone comes on here asking for help and all they get is a hard time.
That's not right, everyone need a little help.

Danbar: the average pool deck on a residential pool is approx. 750 yards of concrete.
don't do it by the bag , that's way to much work. Call your local concrete company ask for one truckload of 95k65 @ 8500 psi mix. that should work well for pools and the chemicals.
Exactly
 

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Love me some Concrete
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you guys are jerks.
Someone comes on here asking for help and all they get is a hard time.
That's not right, everyone need a little help.

Danbar: The average pool deck on a residential pool is approx. 750 yards of concrete.
Don't do it by the bag , that's way to much work. Call your local concrete company ask for one truckload of 95k65 @ 8500 psi mix. That should work well for pools and the chemicals.
lol!
 

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Love me some Concrete
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crap i have been doing it wrong, i have been useing length x width x depth, no wonder my crap is always low, thanks for the heads up:whistling
Its low because of the evaporation as stated above. Also, if you pour it at a 8/9" slump, you can just shake the forms and it will self level if you tell the plant to put in the self leveling cream.
 

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Its low because of the evaporation as stated above. Also, if you pour it at a 8/9" slump, you can just shake the forms and it will self level if you tell the plant to put in the self leveling cream.
Is that kind of like the stuff you see in a movie , where they are pouring a guy in concrete.
 
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