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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First of all let me say I am new to this forum and hello to everyone. I just did a bathroom remodel and the client was very pleased, iv done a number of tile showers but the time in between is pretty long and I cant remember how I handled certain problems. The problem is this....when I install the Hardiback I run it out the shower to the next stud and this creates a but joint to the drywall all the way up the wall. Now trying to float the wall flat again is almost imposible especially when your only about 10" to the shower wall.{ in my area you cant have drywall inside the shower} so im left with a bit of a crown where the drywall and Hardiback meet after taping, topping and skimming, any ideas how I can avoid this issue without having to float the entire wall outside the shower or atleast half of it? Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That was the first thing I thought of but thought I would have issues with the Hardiback not being a true 1/2" in thicknessbut I guess if I do that and mesh the joint float the shower side with thinset and bring the tile a little past the joint I would be fine....thanks for the input.
 

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When I do bath tile I always pre-plan and frame it out. All my rock to backer transitions are double 2X's, glued and screwed together.

That's what I do and I double up the studs for shower doors/glass. I bring the tile to the corner or just go past the drywall transition. Either way the transition is outside the shower. I mesh the transition but I don't apply thinset so I don't have the crown.
 

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We use USG Fiberock instead of 1/2" hardi, as the Fiberock is a true 1/2" that meets well with drywall with no hump. We also put the seam in line with the outside of the curb and then run bullnose in front of the curb.
 

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We get it from our local tile supplier. Not sure about your area. Some of the big boxes carry it. Also, make absolutely sure you red guard or something comparable before tiling, as Fiberock is gypsum based. It would probably be ok without it, but you can never be too careful.
 

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If the Hardi is not a full 1/2", there's this really cool thing called a shim. It looks just like a piece of wood.

If you are in the Antarctica and there is none of these wooden shims, then take felt paper and fold it over several times until it creates the needed thickness.

It's not brain surgery.

Edit: The felt would go behind the Hardi, and if you needed to know this, then you don't need to be in this business.
 

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It's called work smarter not harder. Why do all the work of shimming every single stud when you can just buy a different product that is actually less expensive than Hardi?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Actually the thickness difference doesn't really have much to do with it, but joints are just harder to get flat because they don't have the inset that the seems in drywall does, now that I think about it, its the proximity of the but joint to the inside shower wall so adding a stud and putting the joint where ya need it so you can bring the tile out past it is the ticket. And yes sometimes we (meaning me) uverlook the abvious, but in this case don't think a shim is the obvious...yeah I know...I need to work on my spelling.
 

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It's called work smarter not harder. Why do all the work of shimming every single stud when you can just buy a different product that is actually less expensive than Hardi?
Not everybody has access to a variety of different products. Just like the guy who kept telling me that I should be using Schluter products after I repeatedly told him that nobody in my immediate area (at that time) carried what i needed. (Somebody does now, btw.)
 

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Actually the thickness difference doesn't really have much to do with it, but joints are just harder to get flat because they don't have the inset that the seems in drywall does, now that I think about it, its the proximity of the but joint to the inside shower wall so adding a stud and putting the joint where ya need it so you can bring the tile out past it is the ticket. And yes sometimes we (meaning me) uverlook the abvious, but in this case don't think a shim is the obvious...yeah I know...I need to work on my spelling.
Hey... it's like everything else in the building industry. Sometimes, just exploring makes for the best teacher. The more you do, the more you learn how to prepare for the FUTURE situations that you're going to create. It's funny, but since the first time I posted in this thread I've run across the same thing... almost.

The house I'm in was built in the first quarter of the 1900's. Not sure when, but they used the wall board that came in 8' x 2' sections and then they plastered over the entire surface. That's fine, but at some point around 1960, they remodeled this bathroom with today's sheetrock and simply placed it over the top of the old stuff. When I removed the old mortar based tile, it left me with about an inch and a quarter space to fill. I simply cut some 1 by's into strips and furred out the studs, then prepped the surface with mud to create a level playing field and covered it with Schluter membrane. It worked out fine.

Normally, I would have just ripped it out from floor to ceiling, but that would have left me with a big un-popcorned strip along the edge of the ceiling and I didn't want to have to deal with that crap and I didn't want to have to put in crown to cover it up.

Live and learn.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Exploring is exactly what I was doing when I posted this post. I already thought about shimming, I already thought about adding the stud or studs, I just wanted to hear other ideas cause im always up for learning something new, I got some respectable responses and one not so respectable response.....my mom always told me son...if ya dont have anything nice to say dont say anything at all.
 

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I don't tile
But, I have a great tile guy who I have framed for.
That's what he does: he uses CBB that is the same thickness as the drywall and puts the seam under the bullnose and a nailer under the seam.

You have two choices listed above.
 

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dnkb
Another way to eliminate the crown is to remove 1/8" (+-) from the stud you are joining the two materials on. This insets the two materials and finishes flush. Very easy if you are framing but can be done to existing studs.
Bill T
 
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