Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
friend of family has a new handicapped mom
her downstairs bathroom is only a half-bath , toilet , and small vanity.
i really don`t want to chip out the floor and run a waste line , and leave her with a shower next to a toilet and have no vanity or sink)
they asked if i can run hot and cold lines out to their back patio ( from the kitchen sink , and make a temporary shower stall on the back patio ( its out of view)
the sink is on the wall that leads out , but its about 8 feet away from that exterior wall.

i`d have to make the under-sink lines go outside.
am i better off removing the shut-offs , and making a t , and have 2 sets of shut-offs on each pipe? , and sending 2 lines along the wall that leads out?
can those lines be flex lines of any kind?( i have to run behind the dishwasher , and about 5 feet of cabinets)
or am i better using copper? or pvc?
outside i want to make a shower room , with cedar walls and grab bars . i want her to be able to lean on the walls.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,374 Posts
I'd T them so you can shut them off if it gets cold outside. I'd do it in pex.

I'm not a plumber, just bit of a hillbilly, so just go for it.

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,825 Posts
It depend how temporary, and how confined the space under the sink, etc.

My plumber ran some extra long dishwasher lines (flex) right off the sink and out to his deck shower. Looked, ridiculous, but it worked.

You could just leave the valves, and tee off after the valve. HD has a tee that compression-connects directly to a stop-valve, like connecting a supply line. Kind of gimmicky, but it's easy.

This might be it, but double-check.
https://www.google.com/search?q=com...KHV8VBeQQ9QEwAXoECAEQBg#imgrc=x9MWXpvlyLuD0M:
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
6,956 Posts
I'd install the tee before the existing valve, otherwise you will not have sufficient flow to the new shower. I'd probably install a couple of ball valves just before the new tee.

Pex pipe is a flexible option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
390 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I'd install the tee before the existing valve, otherwise you will not have sufficient flow to the new shower. I'd probably install a couple of ball valves just before the new tee.

Pex pipe is a flexible option.
YEA , I want to make sure i have the pressure.

a ball-valve , i guess because most shut-offs are for only /4 inch line ?, i need i guess a full half inch piping of some type?

sorry , not my forte, but i have to help.
if i could do all it in wood:no: , i`d have no problem:blink:
 

·
Contractor
Joined
·
6,956 Posts
At the current fixture where you plan to cut in the new pipes, the sink you mentioned, should have 1/2" pipe on the supply side of the existing valve, the service side is most likely 3/8", that is the reasoning for cutting in the new services before the existing valve.

I like ball valves because they offer full diameter and shut off pretty well when needed.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top