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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got a couple questions in regard to painting pre-primed solid core interior doors.

There are areas where the primer has been rubbed off for whatever reason. Should I spot prime them with a can of kilz or am I going to be a lot happier re-priming the whole door? They all have areas around the raised panel that are "fuzzed" a little.

I sprayed the trim already and I had one area that I had hit with kilz because we sanded through the primer doing nail holes (MDF 1x6). Even with two coats of advantage 900 semi over it, in the right light I can see the spot that I primed. I did forget to sand it before I sprayed the trim, it is smooth but somehow that is telegraphing through.

I don't want a bunch of splotches all over my doors????

Also, I have the erect-a-rak system that I could stack my doors on for painting but was wondering if I'd be a lot happier spraying them vertically (I spray them away and carry them into a clean, dust free area for drying). I've never tied them together and sprayed them vertically before, how do you handle the bottoms of the doors as far as keeping them up off the floor so nothing funky happens when you spray???
 

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Are you being paid enough to make priming the doors worthwhile ? They would look nicer, but if you are losing money doing it then I would spot prime them. I usually use a brush to touch up hairy MDF, that way it penetrates the hairs and I can sand on it some.
Lay down some rosin paper to spray the doors on, if it starts getting too much overspray on it then throw it away and put down a new piece.
Not sure what that rack system you have is. I used to spray all the doors leaning against a 4 foot ladder then lean the corner of the door against the wall to dry. Now I have these bracket things that hook on to the top and line them up, don't know what they are called. With the brackets I just let them dry where I spray them.
That's my main problem with MDF, once something damages the face of it , it gets all hairy and is a pain to make look right.
 

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If all you're doing is spot priming areas where some primer has rubbed off, then re priming the entire door isn't necessary. You're most likely seeing shiners because you primed with a primer that dries harder than the finish coat (changes the surface reflectivity). Spot prime with something that doesn't dry so hard. Kilz is almost like putting lacquer-shellac on.

For spraying doors vertically, place some spacers under the bottom so the leading bottom edge isn't sitting on anything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If all you're doing is spot priming areas where some primer has rubbed off, then re priming the entire door isn't necessary. You're most likely seeing shiners because you primed with a primer that dries harder than the finish coat (changes the surface reflectivity). Spot prime with something that doesn't dry so hard. Kilz is almost like putting lacquer-shellac on.

For spraying doors vertically, place some spacers under the bottom so the leading bottom edge isn't sitting on anything.
Any primer in particular that you would recommend?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes I would reprime them. Not just the areas you burned through but the whole door. That really isn't even primer they put on most mdf doors. You can wipe it off with a wet rag in many cases, and what you are witnessing is a failure in enamel holdout.
I wouldn't mind if it meant just spraying them an extra time, but for 20 doors, to re-prime, sand, clean...bunch of work/mess/extra cost in primer.
 

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I'm not familiar with that paint, I don't know how well it covers. Is there a BenjaminMoore near you? For painting millwork I've had good luck with BenjaminMoore Advance applied over Fresh Start primer. If you're using semi-gloss, that will show more defects. If you can get away with it, use satin. Kilz is more for sealing cat urine and fire damage, a little too strong for touch up priming. It's not surprising if you do touch up with Kilz then put semi-gloss paint over it you'll have problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Its kind of a bummer on a couple of door casing pieces where I touched up you can see a splotch where I touched up with kilz. Glad I didn't do more. Lesson learned. Definitely don't want to take a chance on the doors.

I went with semigloss for clean-ability. It sure does show every defect if the lighting is right...
 

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Back in the good old days of real wood we used to prime everything with a lacquer undercoater. Stuff dries fast and sands like a dream. Now I would be scared that the lacquer would be too hot and activate the cheap primer under it.
One builder we sometimes work for uses the cheapest pre-primed trim I have ever seen. Some sections of it look like tree bark that had been primed white. You can lick your thumb and rub the primer off it.
 

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ModernStyle said:
You can lick your thumb and rub the primer off it.
I've never seen pre-primed wood like this. If I did I would certainly not use it unless I was ready to sand all the primer off and start over. I don't care how good of primer and paint you put on, if you have one layer that's not sticking, how is it going to stay on?
 

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Spencer said:
Its kind of a bummer on a couple of door casing pieces where I touched up you can see a splotch where I touched up with kilz. Glad I didn't do more. Lesson learned. Definitely don't want to take a chance on the doors.

I went with semigloss for clean-ability. It sure does show every defect if the lighting is right...
Painted smooth Millwork with semigloss isn't for newb or impatient painters, everything has to be perfect or it will show. The cleanability is nice with semigloss but one thing I tell people is that one of the downsides is when the time comes to paint over it, you got to prime it first. If they are set on wanting semigloss, sometimes I take into consideration that more time will be spent doing prep work.
 

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I've never seen pre-primed wood like this. If I did I would certainly not use it unless I was ready to sand all the primer off and start over. I don't care how good of primer and paint you put on, if you have one layer that's not sticking, how is it going to stay on?
Production houses. We do what they pay us to do. If you deviate from the system you lose money.
You go in and knock them out. It ain't pretty and it ain't nothing you put on your website, but it pays the bills when times are lean.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I'm leaning toward spraying them with two coats of advantage 900. I would think that with two coats it would take care of the imperfections.

I'm am getting an education on trim with semigloss. I chose semi for cleanability but it does show everything. There were spots where I nailed my headband down into my 1x6 header/architrave piece. You can see a few bulges where the nail made it pucker. You've got to get your caulking perfect two. If you put to much on and the edge started to skin over even a little it shows with the paint. This advantage 900 latex doesn't seems to level out anything like oil based used to.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I sprayed the trim already and I had one area that I had hit with kilz because we sanded through the primer doing nail holes (MDF 1x6). Even with two coats of advantage 900 semi over it, in the right light I can see the spot that I primed. I did forget to sand it before I sprayed the trim, it is smooth but somehow that is telegraphing through.
I'm wondering if what I am seeing is actually the build up of the primer, nothing more.???
 
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