Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Remodel
Joined
·
30,123 Posts
Dry, then mill. Dry, then mill. Dry, then mill.

Could have been a tempering issue as well, but I don't see cracks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,062 Posts
You won't be able to cope that profile! Any area of the crown that is parallel to the ceiling will be paper thin, anything past parallel won't cope. The big bead at the top will be the problem area.
Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
You won't be able to cope that profile! Any area of the crown that is parallel to the ceiling will be paper thin, anything past parallel won't cope. The big bead at the top will be the problem area.
Joe
Thanks. Though I won't be doing any of that work.

The crown was spec'd by architect. The installation will be done by the gc or a sub. Not sure who milled the crown.

We just did the cabinetry, cabinetry install and coffer layout.

That cut-off was brought back to the shop the other day by our case work installer. It set off a large discussion about material selection, installation, stability, etc. I thought it interesting enough that perhaps others would like to partake.

The thing really is huge. And there are literally thousands of feet of it running through this house. I'm particularly interested in the joints and inevitable gaps that will come with movement.

With the high gloss finish things will be tough to hide. definitely time for the A Team
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
They are going to have to cope what they can and leave the un-copeable in a mitered state. If they try to just miter it, it will never be tight top to bottom. We had to do some 7 1/2" a couple years ago, milled out of 6/4, was not copeable, had to miter and the middle was impossible to tighten up. If they are shorter runs, can preassemble as much as possible and screwing from the back to draw it tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
StrongTower said:
They are going to have to cope what they can and leave the un-copeable in a mitered state. If they try to just miter it, it will never be tight top to bottom. We had to do some 7 1/2" a couple years ago, milled out of 6/4, was not copeable, had to miter and the middle was impossible to tighten up. If they are shorter runs, can preassemble as much as possible and screwing from the back to draw it tight.
I would love to see how that miter/cope joint is done. Would you care to share any pics or description of the technique.

I guess the idea is that that "ceiling bead" would be a bit misaligned but the cove would be tight?

I agree that kerfing would help alot here. Poplar moves quite a bit when it gets milled.

Great subject!!!!!!

Bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,062 Posts
There is a way to help with the cope, if that's the way your headed. Instead of just cutting the first piece at the normal 90' & fitting cope to that, add a 45' miter just out of the corner, maybe about 3/16" or so. The result is that the cope only has to cover about 3/16 of the 1st piece, & the rest is removed by the miter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
749 Posts
Railman's method is similar, I would cut a 43-44 degree miter on the piece that would be cut at 90. Then when you cut your cope piece at 45 you'll be off the corner so your cope has something to land on. Most of the time it works, might have to fine tune the bead with a chisel to fit.
 

·
Administrator
Maker of Fine Sawdust
Joined
·
53,220 Posts
Well that looks to be a humungous pain in the tookus.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
746 Posts
Someone asked to see the process. It's not that hard. All cutting is done in position. The jack miter is defined and half cut with a SCMS and finished with a hand saw. The short point of the jack is the wall projection of the crown which in this case is 3". That measurement can be repetitively marked with a combination square or a gauge block. The rip cut can be production cut on a table saw with a stopped cut if is already set up or there are enough cuts to warrant setting it up. In this case I used a hand saw. The cope is easily cut with a jigsaw and Coping Foot and tuned with a couple of files. This profile gets paper thin in a couple of spots but that pretty common with many different profiles. The jacks have extra back cut on them with the jigsaw so there is little material behind the short points on the miter to interfere with it closing. If more is required it is cut with a cordless grinder with a sanding wheel which is usually out when I'm running trim anyway. Tune up at the wall if necessary is done with a knife, a sharp chisel with a paring grind, or a bock plane. To cut the cope and jack miter the butt piece takes around 2 minutes but this is a profile I see frequently. Tweaking depends on the walls, ceiling, and whether I'm having a smart day or a stupid one.

The only PITA is having to drag out the SCMS to cut the jack miter instead of my DW716 which I use for about 90% of the trim I run. It's like anything else. If you approach it systematically it doesn't add much time. The additional time added is accounted for in the price.

This profile lends itself to this technique. Only the top needs extra attention. If the profile is more complicated with multiple un-copable sections it gets mitered. This is just another trick in the bag that maybe someone will find useful at some point.
 
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top