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I recently remodeled two bathrooms on the first floor of a condo. Plumbing access was below, just like most of the houses we work on. Is it pretty much assumed, that you will need access from below a shower, to reconnect the drain? What do you do for drain connection if things don't line up. We have not run into the situation much. With us, either there is access from below, or we put in a tile shower.

Working on estimates for customers on the 3rd floor and don't want to leave out the repair costs for the ceiling below, if dated dimensioning, or lack of budgeted options for tubs, dictate, a new tubs drain location?

Last stock shower pan I put in was 36x36 and center, was still center, are tub drain locations usually different, as I have noticed?
 

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No, it is assumed in a condominion that you will do the work from above. The lower units can deny you access if they wish. Furthermore, a half-way decent plumber is used to doing all the work from above. What happens to a slab on grade after the slab is poured? Huh?
 

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While it takes a little more time, there is no reason why you can't rough in any tub or shower drain from above.
Very true.
This is almost always how we do it here.
No way in hell a pain it the ass, downstairs neighbor will let us open their ceiling.
 

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You should have a drop ceiling just above the existing tub (that conceals the p-trap for the tub upstairs) and a high hot. Remove the high hot and take a look with a flashlight. You should have 1-1/2" pipe going from tub to a 2" p-trap below the slab. Replace 1-1/2" pipe with 2" and make sure to install a fire collar to maintain slabs fire rating.
 

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You should have a drop ceiling just above the existing tub (that conceals the p-trap for the tub upstairs) and a high hot. Remove the high hot and take a look with a flashlight. You should have 1-1/2" pipe going from tub to a 2" p-trap below the slab. Replace 1-1/2" pipe with 2" and make sure to install a fire collar to maintain slabs fire rating.
Huh??
 

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First you want to see what you're going to be working with. That is why I mention to look up through the drop ceiling above the tub in the unit you're going to be working in. An easy way to do this is to simply remove a high hot and look through that opening with a flashlight at the plumbing for the tub above. However the plumbing was run in the unit above is most likely the way it is run for your tub. You will still be doing the work from above in your unit just now you know what to expect once you demo the old tub. Check your local code because over here based on the fixture units for a shower we normally must go with 2" drain. If you have 2" now your good however, i've always run into a 1-1/2" pipe from the tub to the 2" p-trap. Requiring us to replace just that section of 1-1/2" pipe. And always remember to fire seal the drain pipe penetration through the slab. Hopefully I explained it better this time.
 

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R Perez, Welcome to the site.
You stated he "should" have a drop ceiling above the existing tub. I've never seen this. Is it a code requirement in your area?

Do you mean access panel? or literally a drop ceiling?
 

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Thanks rselectric1. Usually the slab in condos are either 6" or 8" here in SW Fl. With the drywall being installed as close as possible to the bottom of the slab to gain ceiling heigth but, once you get to the bathrooms the p-trap is installed below the slab taking away from valuable ceiling heigth. Forcing them to frame down the ceiling in the bathroom to be able to conceal the p-trap. Sometimes it's just over the tub area they'll frame down and other times (usually larger showers) they'll frame down the entire bathroom ceiling and do tray ceilings in order to make the ceiling not feel so low.
 

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That's more clear. Must be a regional difference in terms. I thought you meant a drop ceiling (like you would find in a finished basement-not conducive to bathrooms)
I am used to the term soffit.:thumbsup:
 

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R Perez, Welcome to the site.
You stated he "should" have a drop ceiling above the existing tub. I've never seen this. Is it a code requirement in your area?

Do you mean access panel? or literally a drop ceiling?
Regional differences in the language I believe. I'm more familiar with the term soffit for a smaller area just over the tub, or a furred down ceiling for a full ceiling lowered with drywall.

Drop ceiling to me is one made of ceiling tiles and metal track.

Also out here no such thing as a dropped ceiling (tiles and track) in a basement unless it is low income. Everything is finished drywalled ceilings in basements.
 
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