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When you go on an estimate and explain that the room needs to be as clear as possible. Then show up to start and the room is so full of furniture etc. The etc. is worse than the furniture. What do you do? Not having alot of work at this time I did move the stuff but if I was busy enough I might have walked away. Thoughts??
 

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Ripped straight from my contract:

B) CUSTOMER RESPONSIBILITIES:
1. Customer will assume responsibility to remove from any and all work areas, all household and personal items (with the exception of large furniture such as sofas and beds), and store those items away from the work area during the duration of the job. Contractor will not be held liable for damage to any items not removed from the work area. Any and all items remaining in the work area will be moved by the Contractor, and the Customer agrees to pay the Contractor a charge of $55.00 per man-hour for moving these items. Contractor will move large furniture at no cost to the owner (unless specified otherwise). Contractor will not be held liable for any damage caused by moving any items.
 

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...jammin
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It never ceases to amaze me no matter how much I stress to the cust. that I need a clean room, how much junk they can leave in my way
I don't know if they think they cleared it, or they don't care because they know I'll have to do it if I want to get paid
I realized my contract need some meat in this area
PWG sent me this: (thnx PWG!)
ProWallGuy said:
Ripped straight from my contract:

B) CUSTOMER RESPONSIBILITIES:
1. Customer will assume responsibility to remove from any and all work areas, all household and personal items (with the exception of large furniture such as sofas and beds), and store those items away from the work area during the duration of the job. Contractor will not be held liable for damage to any items not removed from the work area. Any and all items remaining in the work area will be moved by the Contractor, and the Customer agrees to pay the Contractor a charge of $55.00 per man-hour for moving these items. Contractor will move large furniture at no cost to the owner (unless specified otherwise). Contractor will not be held liable for any damage caused by moving any items.
Which I think is excellent
The man-hour charges, liability, and the personal items and all
I think it's clear and forceful w/o being rude

I haven't had a chance to test it though
This month I had two good size jobs where I knew I needed it, but I looked at the crap,figured the time it would take me to move it all into vacant rooms and back again (I lucked out there, having places to put the stuff), and added a nice "clear and clean" charge and a "not responsable for personal items" to each proposal and clearly explained what it was for in person
(normally "clean and prep" would be part of the service-these were... exceptions)
Both were accepted w/o an eye bat on the client's part
(I figured if they bitched I would say well, you can take care of that if you'd like, which would have been fine by me...but that wasn't needed)
I cleared each place in 1/3 of the time I thought it would take
And it was cleared of everything, just the way I like it
The H/O in each case only had me move the big stuff back so they could "go through" the personal stuff so that was just 20 minutes or so
I would not offer that all the time, but it worked out well in these instances, and I would try it again if it seemed appropriate
 

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I have a clause like this in my contract as well and have learned to go preview the site the day before so that I have time to call LaborFinders, if needed.

My contract specifies a min. of 8 man/hrs. because the minimum for the labor co. is 4 hrs. and I'll need at least 2 guys.
 

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I too have all those clauses in my contract and I go over the issue of moving anything that needs to be moved at some point with them, but...

First day on the job as soon as I get there I check out the work area, if stuff is still there, the first thing I do is get the homeowner and tell them in a nice way: "Did you want to move this stuff or leave it here? Anything you don't want broken or covered in dirt and dust you should move out of here, that's the one thing I can guarantee you is that we are going to get it dirty and probably break it too." -throw a little laugh in - The homeowner 99% of the time so far apologizes profusely and gets it out of there while I am unloading the truck.

I think they just forget, don't give the homeowner too much credit, we go through this everyday, they go through it maybe once every 5-10 years.

Of course if its a baby grand piano sitting there then you have a whole other set of cicumstances to deal with and then I would have no problems pulling out the contract and showing them the clause about it, that would be immediately followed up by filling out a change order and having them sign it.
 

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Remodeler
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Discussion Starter #6
ProWallGuy said:
Ripped straight from my contract:

B) CUSTOMER RESPONSIBILITIES:
QUOTE]

Thanks Pro.
I have added this clause to my workup for a contract. I don't have one yet. This will get me going on writing it.

Appreciated.
 

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[do you mind sharing your clause for large bulky items such as a piano please?
 

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I need to add this to my contract as well. To date everyone has capitulated but the day is coming and it doesn't pay to be lazy.

I'm thinking of hiring pro movers for large, valuable items and antiques full of knick-knacks. Something like "Large valuable furniture, antiques, furniture containing valuable items such as statues and dishes will be packed and moved by a reputable moving company and stored if required. The owner will be responsible for all costs plus a 15% supervisory fee."
 

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Teetorbilt said:
I need to add this to my contract as well. To date everyone has capitulated but the day is coming and it doesn't pay to be lazy.

I'm thinking of hiring pro movers for large, valuable items and antiques full of knick-knacks. Something like "Large valuable furniture, antiques, furniture containing valuable items such as statues and dishes will be packed and moved by a reputable moving company and stored if required. The owner will be responsible for all costs plus a 15% supervisory fee."
I don't know buddy, there always comes a point in something like that were you have to stop and CYA. The CYA probably involves not being any part of it and letting the homeowner be responsible for moving it themselves. You might give them a referal to help them out and expidite getting it done, because left to their own devices they could end up stalling out for weeks just trying to get somebody hired.

But at some point when the valuables are more valuable then you feel you want to risk by making yourself liable as the middle man for that 15%, it would be time to let the homeowner pay the mover directly and leave you out of it and leave you out of any liability.

There is always the issue if the mover blows it, you get held liable as the guy who was culpable because you were being paid by the homeowner and you were paying the mover. In that scenario you would be forced to just make it right with your customer and deal with the movers on your own. Not something I would want to get tied up with if I could avoid it.

Last year I helped out a past customer by installing some glass flowers on her wall over her mantle. I charged them about $90 for the hour to do it, but later I found out that she paid over $15,000 for these things! They were delicate as all hell, and her husband broke one of the petals on one himself, after this stupid little job all I kept thinking was how stupid I was to put myself at risk for $15,000 for $90.00. Stupid, stupid, stupid!
 

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I would agree that the etc.s in these situations is worse than moving a sofa or breakfront ,somthing i avoid but usally end up doing anyway.As for something like a piano that cannot easily be moved covering it with shipping blankets and possibly a plywood enclosure at extra charge of course would resolve the problem.
 

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ppmc said:
[do you mind sharing your clause for large bulky items such as a piano please?
Read this:
Finley said:
I don't know buddy, there always comes a point in something like that were you have to stop and CYA. The CYA probably involves not being any part of it and letting the homeowner be responsible for moving it themselves.
Exactly. Anything too big or expensive, let them deal with it.
 

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DGR,IABD
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Piano's are funny things, that have to be stored in reasonably controlled conditions to remain sound. I've only delt with one piano relocation (my own), and during the time away from home, it was stored in a back room at the store where it was purchased for a small fee (other than the fee they charged to move it). Worth every penny. One price to take it away, store it for a spell, bring it back and re-tune it. That's another thing about pianos. Every time you move one, it's supposed to be retuned. Enough about that. I just figured I'd pass along the head's up to call a piano store to move a piano in the event that any of you all run into a situation where you actually need a piano moved.
 

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...jammin
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Hmmm...pianos
I would not move one for the reasons mdshunk mentioned
It may seem silly but they can be very touchy
I would play it, but not move it

I should also mention about the grandfather clocks
I don't know if any of you guys run across these
Don't touch them
I'm in Antique Alley here and I run into these thing all the time
These old ones are so touchy, moving them 2" w/o proper prep can require a tech house call and hundreds of dollars to re-adjust them
Never mind if you actually move them and really throw them out of wack
 

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slickshift said:
Hmmm...pianos
I would not move one for the reasons mdshunk mentioned
It may seem silly but they can be very touchy
I would play it, but not move it

I should also mention about the grandfather clocks
I don't know if any of you guys run across these
Don't touch them
I'm in Antique Alley here and I run into these thing all the time
These old ones are so touchy, moving them 2" w/o proper prep can require a tech house call and hundreds of dollars to re-adjust them
Never mind if you actually move them and really throw them out of wack
If you do decide to move a grandfather clock,when you take out the pendulium and weights WEAR WHITE GLOVES the oils on your hands will turn the brass black and try to secure pendulium anchor to weight chains. :Thumbs:
 

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md's dead on about pianos. My mother was a concert pianist and has a Steinway baby grand. She calls a company that's 30 mi. away antime anything needs to be done to it.

Mike's probably right about letting the HO deal with special items, no reason to take an ins. hit because you are doing something outside of your field.
 

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Teetorbilt said:
md's dead on about pianos. My mother was a concert pianist and has a Steinway baby grand. She calls a company that's 30 mi. away antime anything needs to be done to it.

Mike's probably right about letting the HO deal with special items, no reason to take an ins. hit because you are doing something outside of your field.
not outside of my field actually.I drove for graebel van lines and united van lines for years b-4 I decided to paint full time years back,I have a .02 claims ratio with united and was a allstar driver for graebel,I moved ppl presidents of companies to vice presideints of procurment for south western bell(i landed the acct also for graebel)and pianos .clocks etc,are not something to be toyed with if you have never been around them and have no idea what to do.no guessing there,all i am saying is I know and offered some advice but no way was i saying go ahead and try but them walmart clocks and stuff are just that (crap)anyone who is careful and does not touch the brass with there bare hands can do it.BUT a real g-father clock needs a professional in that field to handle the task properly the first time.
 
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