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Lead paint was eliminated in the majority of new homes after world war 2. Only a select few very upscale custom homes had lead on the outside of their home. Technically any home built up until 1978 could have some lead but that is extremely rare.
This was another money making scheme by government and I feel its the homeowners responsibility. If they want a home built in the 1920’s, they better accept the fact that their children could be subjected to lead.
They have a choice, either buy the older home with all that charm or dont. Poor people in public housing is a different story, they mostly dont have a choice. The spoiled millenials who want the old victorian in the diverse area are on their own as far as Im concerned.
 

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Radical Basement Dweller
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Lead paint was eliminated in the majority of new homes after world war 2. Only a select few very upscale custom homes had lead on the outside of their home. Technically any home built up until 1978 could have some lead but that is extremely rare.
This was another money making scheme by government and I feel its the homeowners responsibility. If they want a home built in the 1920’s, they better accept the fact that their children could be subjected to lead.
They have a choice, either buy the older home with all that charm or dont. Poor people in public housing is a different story, they mostly dont have a choice. The spoiled millenials who want the old victorian in the diverse area are on their own as far as Im concerned.
Documentation for your assertion please.

Thanks.
 

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GC
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Lead paint was eliminated in the majority of new homes after world war 2. Only a select few very upscale custom homes had lead on the outside of their home. Technically any home built up until 1978 could have some lead but that is extremely rare.
This was another money making scheme by government and I feel its the homeowners responsibility. If they want a home built in the 1920’s, they better accept the fact that their children could be subjected to lead.
They have a choice, either buy the older home with all that charm or dont. Poor people in public housing is a different story, they mostly dont have a choice. The spoiled millenials who want the old victorian in the diverse area are on their own as far as Im concerned.
This doesn't align with my experience at all.
 

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Butcher of wood and metal
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I would say the closer you get to 1978 the less chance there there is. But from 48 on am sure it not that rare. And besides EPA say you have to test or assume that it has lead and follow their rules acordingly.
 
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