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Renaissance Man
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6,818 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Had to retrofit a door lock for Mom to replace the original 1942 model mortise lock.

That's right, 72 years of service for this lockset and door and Mom is hoping I can keep it going a little longer. The deadbolt portion has a broken spring and the internals of the lockset look like a Swiss clock :blink:

Told her I could probably fix it, but being I ain't Swiss and such, how bout we put a standard lockset in :thumbup:

A lil' Bondo glass, some primer and paint, we'll have it looking like new :whistling

Cant beat these old TDL doors, substantially heavy, hard and straight as an arrow...even the frames are a solid two inch :thumbsup:
 

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3,196 Posts
On the fence for my own front door about doing that or shelling out the cash for a new emtek mortise lock
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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25,429 Posts
Aw, I thought the thread was going to be about putting an old-style mortise lock in a modern door. :sad:

I could make a nice living repairing the old ones... if anyone would pay what it takes. I'm constantly getting asked, and then rewarded with the deer in the headlights look.

Nice job. :thumbsup:
 

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1,841 Posts
I hate the new style locks. Sure they go in easy enough, but the mortis locks are really built to last.Time wise, I'd just plunk a new set in at 100 bucks. A good bump resistant dead bolt set will still run you 50 bucks.
 

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Contractor of the Month
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I hate the new style locks. Sure they go in easy enough, but the mortis locks are really built to last.Time wise, I'd just plunk a new set in at 100 bucks. A good bump resistant dead bolt set will still run you 50 bucks.
Who cares if it's a bump resistant deadbolt, you either cheap out and get any old lock or you get a real lock in the 200+ dollar range.

I've done the same thing super has done a few times replacing mortise locks with a cheap lock set. But I didn't handle any of the finishing and painting, final product looks good.
 

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It looks great as always.

Who cares how strong it is. The lock will only keep out an honest person. A real thief will just break the glass and open the door. I know. I repaired the glass before.
 

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hack of all trades
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1,144 Posts
I don't have any keys but it looks like theyd all have the same simple key. Since they're all from interior doors and I'm using them on interior doors locking isn't important. My house was built around 1890's and these were scrap from a Chicago job in multi unit residential built late 1800's/early 1900's so they're pretty neat for free.
 

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hack of all trades
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The client I was working for did his own painting and other miscellaneous stuff in the rental units. His "patching" of old mortises and knob holes was quite hideous to say the least. Basically slapped on a chunk of wood filler with no scraping or sanding. OP did nice job covering be up the old voids, but this guy was slop master extraordinaire and quite pleased with the results !
 

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Head Light Bulb Changer
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847 Posts
Nice work! I had to do the same thing on my front door (house built in 1941) and really hated doing it. I couldn't find a new lockset to fit the original hole or anyone to rebuild the original.
 

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hack of all trades
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m1911 said:
I've done a few of those, but I route it out and glue in solid wood. I don't use Bondo for wood repairs, since it will fail.
Filling with solid wood is definitely the way to go. I don't know of many filler products that would stand up to the pressure and movement that happen in that area, especially filling such a huge void.
 
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