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brm1109
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need some advise. I am bidding on a trash-out of a home. The problem is that the house also had water damage and mold has grown on most of the stuff inside. So my question:
1. Do I have to treat the trash with anything before putting it in dumpsters?
2. I would probably have to tear down the sheet rock, how would I treat that?

Thanks
 

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Superior Firepower
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5,089 Posts
I need some advise. I am bidding on a trash-out of a home. The problem is that the house also had water damage and mold has grown on most of the stuff inside. So my question:
1. Do I have to treat the trash with anything before putting it in dumpsters?
2. I would probably have to tear down the sheet rock, how would I treat that?

Thanks
Wear a full body Tyvek suit and the best respirator (asbestos rated) you can afford. Minimum.
 

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Skyhook is correct. PPE is important when dealing with mold.

The trash doesn't need treated with anything, just bag it up and throw it out. Sheetrock the same way, bag it up and throw it out. Anything else that has mold on it that can't be removed/rep[laced needs treated with proper chemicals to kill the mold (no, bleach does not work).

If you have mold in this house you have mold spores floating around and spread through the entire house. You may want to consider hiring a restoration company to do a mold remediation.
 

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Sluggin away
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mold removal

Bid the interior debris as a hazard :nuke:at going rate of 2.5 times the normal HUD cyd removal rate since you will be working in a hazardous environment. THEN let the professionals take over by bidding mold remediation. Look on the yellow pages or on this site (there are some with posts) or I go to IICRC.org and find a professional in your area. I see on your profile rubbish removal so I am presuming you are in the P&P field which means you more than likely don't have a commercial pollution liability policy to cover you for potential claims from mold remediation...Could be wrong but most don't. Have fun and wear the proper protection and make sure the work comp policy is paid! :whistling
 

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sprayer48
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69 Posts
brm. the above guys are correct. wear full gear at the very least. change the respirator filters a couple of times. the stuff with mold on in should be bagged before thrown into the dumpster.
 

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This may be a bit delayed, just thought that others may still benefit from these. Try spraying a solution of water and vinegar in the trash to minimize or stop the growth of molds before puting them in the dumpster. :thumbup:
 

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Hopefully you haven't started yet. If you agree to do this "abatement" and you don't get all the mold, you may be looking at a lawsuit. You touch it, you own it. Those who do that type of work, legitimately, take training classes in mold remediation. Many contractor's liability insurance policies, if not all, won't insure you for that work.
 

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brm1109
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392 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Actually I would be taking care of the trash removal like the furniture. I had another contractor give a bid for the actual mold removal. Beyond my scope. It's been all this time and they still have not made a decision on the mold or trash removal.
The only thing is that I gave them the proposal and put in it that because of the conditions, the amount is only good for 10 days and goes up every week.
 

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I have attended and passed several classes on mold including the IICRC Applied Microbial Remediation Technichian. There are not much in the way of laws for clean up, just guidelines such as the ones from New York State. The IICRC usually recommends setting up containment, negative air machine, HEPA Vacuum and wearing PPE. When I come across mold I look at several factors including the size of the area affected and the location. The IICRC recommends bagging all debri before disposing of in a dumbster. Bleach is considered a biocide and is only effective if the surface remains wet for a certain amount of time, I think 10min, and ONLY works on non porous surfaces. The EPA does not recommend the use of bleach and nor do I. A little dishwashing soap, either DAWN or JOY only, mixed with water is what you use on porous surfaces. You scrub the surface with some sort of brush, a wire brush works well. After cleaning if you want to be extra thorough you can paint on a mold encapsulating product.
 

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G.C.
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Hopefully you haven't started yet. If you agree to do this "abatement" and you don't get all the mold, you may be looking at a lawsuit. You touch it, you own it. Those who do that type of work, legitimately, take training classes in mold remediation. Many contractor's liability insurance policies, if not all, won't insure you for that work.
Good advice above.

Not sure about New Jersey. In California, if there is mold on large parts of the walls, and you do not have a lot of experience in removing mold, it would be best to run from the job. If there is a lot of mold on the walls there may be mold in the fraiming that requires a lot of labor to remove.

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If you do get this job and will then be using a sub-contractor for the mould abatement, make sure you get a Certificate of Insurance from them clearly stating that their liability insurance covers "the operations of the Named Insured as a mould abatement contractor".

Then, most important, also have your company name (and any other legal entity names that you might be operating under and that are involved with this project) added as an Additional Insured to that sub's liability policy "with respect to mould abatement operations at (insert project name and address here)."

Ask for a minimum of $2,000,000 liability limits and that you want coverage extended to include Products and Completed Operations with a 24 month period past the completion date of the project. (12 months will probably do as well, but you should be able to ask and get 24 months). That way, if the mould comes back after several months, you have recourse to claim under the abatement sub's insurance.
 
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