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i went to bid on a lady's floors the over day and these are my findings. it is a house on piers and was built in 1957. wooden planks as subfloor, tar paper moisture barrier, and then 4 inch oak natural wood floor on top, never had a problem. she remodeled the house in 2008, 40000 dollars later she didnt have the money to sand and refinish the floors so she purchased that resilant vinyl laydown flooring that looks like wood. so later she could pull it back up and sand and refinish the original floors. the original oak floor soaked up moisture and buckled. up to 2 inches in some places. she pulled up the vinyl and is letting the oak dry out. the resilant floor company is paying for the new floor but will not replace the original bc they dont want home depot finding out about this. i need to know if there is a breathable floor product out there to overlay so the moisture can circulate through the ac or if i can patch and use glue down or what. several people have looked at it and are boggled. global industries came out and said she has great insulation and great ventilation underneath house. they also said this application of the vinyl floor should have never been used in the state of louisiana, they have problems popping up everywhere
 

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The problem is that there was a vapour barrier below and above the original floor. That's what let moisture get trapped when the vinyl floor was installed.

I'm surprised that as a flooring contractor you are unsure of that the options are in this case....
 

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i was unsure about if i could overlay it with glue down bruce egineered wood. im just a small fry and i am just getting started in my business. but i am trying to educate myself through social networking so i can help these customers. this woman has gotten several guys to come look and were all baffled. i could just overlay it but i want to make sure i do the right thing for a lifetime floor
 

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what floors are being bought and installed for less than the cost of refinsihing?
secondly,

no floors are going over it now with it buckled....her money is best spent in her wood floor.
 

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i was unsure about if i could overlay it with glue down bruce egineered wood.
Now wait a minute ... The homeowner doesn't have any money to refinish the original floors, but has money to overlay with Bruce engineered flooring? That doesn't make any sense. :blink:

I suggest calling in a few repair/refinish specialists to bid fixing the original floors. Unless they've been damaged beyond salvage, repair and refinishing will be the way to go. :thumbsup:
 

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the bruce engineered wood she is looking at is 2.19 sq ft. the original fllor has alot of damge from the remodeling done in 2008, there is alot of patches and where its buckled now, other people have told her it would take 1-3 months to dry out. but it really needs to be replaced. the oak to patch it if she were to refinish is 3.49 a sq ft. she also called a couple of guys about sanding and refinishing and they both told her around 3.00 to sand it and 3.00 to finish it
 

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the bruce engineered wood she is looking at is 2.19 sq ft. the original fllor has alot of damge from the remodeling done in 2008, there is alot of patches and where its buckled now, other people have told her it would take 1-3 months to dry out. but it really needs to be replaced. the oak to patch it if she were to refinish is 3.49 a sq ft. she also called a couple of guys about sanding and refinishing and they both told her around 3.00 to sand it and 3.00 to finish it

This ain't jivin. If the floors are that wet, call a fire restoraction company to put dehumdifiers & fans in the house & get the moisture down. 1-2 weeks tops. Find a company with hardwood floor matts for their driers. Couple years ago, we save a floor that had 6" of water on them for nearly a week. Insurance company was happy.

A good flooring guy can pull the patches & tooth back in replacement boards. Not a big deal, just a little time consuming & tedius.

The $6/ft quote is really not jivin. It's probably $3/ft to sand & finish, otherwise, I'll consider moving to IA if you guys can demand that kinda pricing. Your Bruce flooring at $2.19/ft is not going to include any labor to lay it ya know? She'll need to more than double that price to include the labor. Sanding & repairing should still be cheaper & a better quality floor in the long run.
 

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Those numbers sound a bit high to me, but whatever. The major problem with trying to bandaid the situation is that the cost of repair starts doubling and tripling over what it would have cost to do it right the first time.

Attempt to bandaid #1 - Owner paid how much to have alternate flooring purchased and installed, then had to pay to have it removed plus the additional moisture damage and buckling that will now cost more to repair.

Attempt to bandaid #2 - Owner will pay you to "level" out the floor, patching those voids with scrap, then purchase more material to overlay the original flooring. End result - owner will then pay someone else MORE money to remove what you've done and patch it correctly.

Had the homeowner just done it right the first time, there would be none of these residual costs. She would be spending far less for perfect floors rather than having had to live with the expense, time, and hassles of all these bandaids.

Again, I would highly recommend calling in a refinisher for a total repair/refinish quote, and then you work up a total repair/overlay/trim quote and compare the two final figures.

Doing things right the first time is ALWAYS cheaper than scabbing and having to redo the work later.
 

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i contacted customer and she is insisting that she is done with the existing wood floors and wants to cover them. my question is can u blind nail engineered wood. thats her question
 

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in spots. the lady called my earlier and said she pulled up all the vinyl and all the exterior walls was dry but everywhere else she had to shopvac the water up. thats alot of moisture. my thoughts are that original oak even though it has moisture barrier underneath has been getting moisture through but been able to breath and recirculate though the ac. so in stead of glueing the engineered wood, im thinking maybe if i tore out and patched the buckled spots and just nailed the wood down it would allow the humidity to breath just like it has been doing since '57. also she has 2 bathrooms and a wasroom that had vct down and it is peeling up. so she is wanting to know if i can run ceramic in there
 

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I sure hope that your not charging this lady $6.00sf to sand & finish, and I also hope you come across to her like like a pro after reading all this.
 
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