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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a few city projects coming up that I will be hiring a mason to do some 12" footers for cinderblock walls for a rowhouse and a few of the same for a small home addition. Both projects have no driveway and the cost for me to get a permit for parking in the front is over $5,000 of drawings and city fees per job.

I have a friend who has a bobcat mount mixer and two standalone mixers he can bring onto site (the bobcat can be loaded through the alley(no car/truck will fit) and I have laborers who can keep them fed and move the material for my mason. One mason quoting the job said with plenty of rebar and a delay additive to the concrete that we can pour these without any cold joints with these three mixers going.

In the opinion of the experts here does this sound feasible? I know it's going to be a lot of work but the alternative is obtaining city approval for the construction zone, having our cleanup afterward inspected, paying for a sidewalk permit to close the sidewalk, paying for a guy to direct traffic at the sidewalk, paying for a ramp and everything else for diversion at the sidewalk. I've done all this before and on one job it was almost $14,000 in costs and more importantly a lot of hassle and stress. It still required a ton of laborers as well to wheelbarrow it all from the truck to the back.

I've been on some other jobs where they followed the site mixing procedure I'm suggesting , I wasn't there pour day but the quality afterwards looked good and everything passed inspection. These jobs are for my own properties as well so just passing on the parking/permit cost to the customer, ie. me, isn't that palatable.
 

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It certainly can be done the way you describe, but....

If you can get all this other equipment into the alley, can you get a mini mixer truck in there also? There is a company in DC that has 4 yard mixer trucks that have been able to deliver in areas that were tough to get my F-350 in and out of.

I have also run a skid loader with a concrete bucket on it, out to the truck when necessary.

There are lots of ways to skin this cat....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Tom,

Did the mini mixer require on site chute cleanup or did it have a way to feed wheelbarrows without the driver needing to hosedown or clean there?

The job in Annapolis has a regulation of needing the permit if they are cleaning there along with me playing cleanup crew on the actual street/sidewalk , I'd also need to be able to fit him on the tiny pull-in drive of the site. On that job there is no alley and no loading zone/street parking possible, there also isn't room for him to double park the truck without me again getting expensive permits to close the parking (half of which is handicap and needs super long advance notice, 45 days if I recall correctly.)

I've done so many of these urban pours where we had all these pedestrians getting in the way (jumping cones/around ramps), bikers cutting off guys running the wheelbarrow, bums harassing us for money while working, traffic causing problems for the flag guys. It's very stressful..I'm just stuck on the fantasy of us toiling away peacefully in the back away from the street even if it takes more labor and time.

EDIT: Wow, just saw the mini mixer trucks on google. That would be perfect for the job with the mini-driveway! I've seen the tow behind versions that size that wouldn't work due to no room to maneuver the trailer but those f350 mounted ones would be perfect.
 

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I agree with tgeb, and have used my Bobcat to haul concrete and dump it right into the footings. If you can bring dry material in, you should be able to bring it in mixed as well. Of course I don't know your particular situation, but have built in NYC, and am currently bidding 2 - 8 family homes that will probably be a challenge. I know there is a redi-mix company in Ct. that has a small truck that they deliver inside the malls; maybe there is one down there. Good luck with the project; jobs in the city are never easy.
 

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raycgl, my post came out to late, so I realize you do not have room to move around with material. It seems like the mini truck would be the way to go if you can get one.

I know what you are saying about the pedestrians. We were pouring sidewalks in the city once, and after we ran the float and waiting to run the broom, all coned and taped off, a woman raised the flagging and walk through the fresh concrete. She got upset at us that her high heeled shoes got dirty! :eek:
 

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Many moons ago,I read in Masonry Construction mag. a blurb about "special" footing blocks for just such a need as yours. I googled them and came up empty handed. You could pour as you mentioned however,would solid 8'x8'x16'" blocks do the trick ? I have used them on small additions.


With pouring,where will you stage the material if the site is so tight ?
 

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Do you mean something like these fjn? They are AAC, so easy to use.


Those would definitely do the trick however,they are not what the magazine showcased. The blocks as I recall were approx.4" wide,8" tall and 16" deep. When 4 blocks were laid side by side the section of footing was 16"long,8" thick,and 16" wide. One of the characteristics of the block was that the top had two groves or channels to accommodate the placement of rebar directly under the first course of wall block (not the best place for it though)


The blocks you showed always captured my interest,sadly there are no producers even close to me. I do like them though,and feel they would work well in that application.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
FJN/Stuart,

Thanks for those links. Those look like they might be perfect.

I know there are ways to use buggies and stuff to go from a truck but my situation is the parking and sidewalk permits that interacting with a regular crete truck will entail. I'm doing a job for a client in downtown DC and we're getting the $18,000 of permits (just for the sidewalk/street access, I always get the building permits I'm a legit entity) and doing it the conventional way because it's not my own funds.

On these two jobs I own the buildings so I'd obviously rather save the money, paying even $2000 more for extra laborers for the 2 days (one day to load in the bags from my pickup, bringing them in 3 trips of 66 bags each and one day to pour) will save me over $10,000 on each job and over $20k total which it being my own money is significant.

I did some work for a gentleman who was on the Forbes list of richest Americans about 10 years ago, we were talking about a tricky bit of site work we had to do after a truck crashed through the hollow sidewalk in front of his downtown highrise. I mentioned how closing the entire street, which was $40k at the time, for the morning would eliminate a lot of headaches compared to just closing the sidewalk. He told me $40,000 will buy a lot of aspirin.

I calculated that it's 3.5 yards of concrete per job, 200 60 pound bags. With 3 mixers going, especially if I use the electric ones which will keep the noise down for neighboring businesses, and a large crew of laborers and a lot of hustle I think we can do it.
 

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Back to the earlier question...

The mini trucks do need a washout area. One option I have used is a washout bag that pump trucks will provide, but "The Bagster" will work also. Problem with these is you need to have it in an area that it can stay long enough to dry out.

This washout drum is an other option that I have not used but intend to try out if I find myself in a sensitive area.

http://www.spillcontainment.com/concrete-washout-filter

The drum is pretty expensive, but should keep you out of trouble in an area like Annapolis.
 

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You didnt say how many feet this was. We talking 200 feet, 80?

Do you think it can be done in a day?

Anything mixed in about a day is good to go imo.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Tom,

Thanks for the heads up on the drum I remember seeing those used in Annapolis once before now that you've jogged my memory.

JBM- I think it can be done in a day, 94 linear feet of footer in one instance and 96 linear feet in the other so one day for each should be fine.
 

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If you need a place to washout here in jersey there is a company that will deliver a small special designed roll off container specific for concrete washout. If you can get something like that and pump from the street. I know it doesn't solve the small space and street closing problem. But with mini trucks it might work.
 
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