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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to get into spaces about 5-6" inside the roof line overhang for nailing of cedar composition lap siding, a 2x10 is at the roof edge fascia so even toe nailing is difficult.
Grip Rite mini is 2 3/4" in height, senco 4". Any comments.
 

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I've got a little GripRite (GRTMP16) that's worked fine. Got it new for $40 or so and for as much as I use it, it does exactly what it's supposed to.
I've had to tighten up the back plate bolts once or twice...that's it. It's a good tool.

Mac
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The mini ones suck.
Any ideas then? My regular palm nailer will not fit or even an angled finish 15ga. I screwed the sheathing with a angle impact[none ever placed by the great track builders] but that was slow and hard to do with Phillips bit. Maybe a square drive would be better.
 

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How about a right angle drill with a mini magnetic bit holder? If you don't have one get a angle drive adapter for 35 bucks and bob's your uncle. Phillips screws are junk.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
People still use philips?
I prefer square drive too, too hard to apply pressure under the eaves on phillips . I just did not have any that short with me. I especially like the Senco self drilling ones from the strip drive. The house is 3000 sq. ft. 2 story vaulted, 27' peak and I am looking for a faster way than using an angle drive up on ladders and jacks with planks. This is not a small job. I have an angle impact, and several angle drills, Bosch PS10 , small Milwaukee drive attm. too.
I am going to try the mini impact from Grip Rite. The Senco might not fit being 4" high.
 

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topsail's trimcat
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during a recent trip to the tool coral at one of the local big boxes, i asked the guy in there about the Hitachi Framer they used to carry now only comes in compressor combo kit. he said they discontinued the individual hitachi guns because replaced with grip rite claims "there just as good if not better than Hitachi's".

ive used several hitachi guns and the only issue ive seen is oil spitting on pre painted cap cod when using our ring nailers guns for harti. (tool much oil). ive used the grip rite 18 gauge pinner and it worked like the disposable porter cable guns.

so are griprite decent tools or just a mid grade one. i cant see them being a match for hitachi
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I bought the senco as it is identical,except for color, the dimentions are the same but the specs say otherwise for some reason, the grip rite costs more , both made in Taiwan. $39 vs $44.
I have NR90AC3 , made in Japan, excellent gun but does not work as well with 8D 2 3/8"RS EG. The n66c bostich coil nailer is better with 6D-8D's. I bought that gun over the Hitachi as a siding nailer needs a sequential trip too, which hitachi make you buy a kit as a $40 part . The Bostich gun itself cost over $100 less. I paid $179. Most all other companies give you both triggers.
I have not tried it yet. I could not make myself spend $6 for 1# of 8D nails at Lowe's. They were grip rite brand.
 

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I have a GripRite and it works like a charm...
 

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I have not tried it yet. I could not make myself spend $6 for 1# of 8D nails at Lowe's. They were grip rite brand.
Let us know how you like or dislike it. When I saw that little SENCO at Homers Depot I grabbed it off the shelf to buy it but at the moment had no use for it so I reluctantly put it back! It was only about $40 But FOWTY DOLLAS is FOWTY DOLLAS!

MZ-HANDYMAN
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well to those that said it is slow, no, it is very fast. Either you did not have enough air pressure/cfm or it was defective. About 100 psi. at the tool, is what I use for most every pneumatic. The larger std. palm nailer is much more controllable. It is sort of a violent tool and almost too fast for confined spaces, and very loud, wear hearing protection. Drove 8D RS galv. in an instant. thru. siding & osb into a stud. The problem is that with the nail in the nailer, a 2 1/2" 8D is too long to fit. A tried some 7D 2" nailes but the would bend easily at the end of the drive. Tried som 2 3/8" from my strips , but still too long. The vibration is bad on your wrist as with almost no mass you are absorbing a lot of shock. I think I am back to screws for this application.
 

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Capra Aegagrus
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It is sort of a violent tool and almost too fast for confined spaces, and very loud, wear hearing protection
Seconded, especially since it seems like just about every time I need it, I'm using it with my head between joists. :blink:

MZ, while $40 is $40, go ahead and grab one. Otherwise, sooner or later you'll find yourself out on a job kicking yourself because you need it and didn't get it. I bought mine last year and didn't actually need it until a month ago, but it bailed me out of a nasty job. :thumbsup:

The one drawback of the Senco (mine, anyway) is that the head of a 16D nail doesn't always fit inside the "plunger" the way it should. It's still usable, but you have to pay attention and sort of balance the device on top of the nail.
 

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It is sort of a violent tool and almost too fast for confined spaces, and very loud, wear hearing protection.
The vibration is bad on your wrist as with almost no mass you are absorbing a lot of shock. I think I am back to screws for this application.
Not to try and convince you of anything but the speed at which it runs a nail home is dependent on how hard you're pushing it against the nail. Let off the (hand) pressure and it stops connecting w/ the nail head.

Not sure why the vibration is so bad for you, some wrist exercises might help. And yes, like with most power and pneumatic tools, ear and eye protection is highly recommended.

As Tinstaafl stated, sometimes it's the one tool on the jobsite that you need. Better to have it in the tool box than not...

Mac
 
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