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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to make sense of the 2000 code on glazing. It appears to say that as long as a single pain is less than 9 sq ft, it can be less than 18 inches above the floor (else it needs to be tempered). The Anderson and building supply rep recomend staying 18" above, sighting horror stories or jobs compelted only to fail inspection.

This application for 5 windows in a row, 3062s, 12" between R0s, owner wants them 9" off the floor (so the terrior can watch the birds or something)

I am calling the county that the remodel is happening in tomorrow to check their application of code. Just thought I'd check in with the forum to see if others have come across this issue
 

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I have to abide by the Miami-Dade code and have little input on your question other than to use tempered glass all of the time. I would install it simply for liability issues. I haven't used plate glass for years after a close call with some glass shelving.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The County Said....

County building inspector basically told me what the code said verbatum. I am going to install them at 10inches without temper glazing. basically, if the individual glazing is less than 9 sq ft, the req for 18 inches does not apply.

I'll let you know in a week or snow.. when we pull an inspection...
 

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Grumpy said:
I know that in my area windows can be installed at floor level, but I also know that anything below 18" from the floor MUST be tempered glass.

Is that Chicago or Cook County code? A couple years ago, I replaced my windows (the house is in Oak Lawn), and while I kept the windows at a fairly standard height, I had been considering going lower. I didn't think of codes for height. I ended up just replacing existing windows with the same size.

On a side note, taking out the old windows was a project in itself, at least until the layout was figured out. They were the original windows in this house, which is true brick built in the 40s. The window tabs were tied directly into the space between the common brick and the cinder blocks. It appeared that the block was laid, then the windows were put in, then the common brick was laid. A Sawzall did the trick on the tabs, but the windows were also apparently assembled in the frame on site. They were aluminum frames which came in many pieces. From what I am told, they were the Cadillac of windows at the time.
 

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While back I got into a similiar deal, this was a brick home built in early 50's. Jambs were mortared to walls :eek: glad we only had bid the two in the front of the house, aren't sawsalls great, truly one of the best tools ever designed! I love the look on people's faces when you fire that up and start cutting out an old window jamb. But what really get's 'em going is when you break out the chainsaw to open up a new doorway. :cheesygri
 
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