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President of the world
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i have wanted to buy one since dewalt put the portable contracters model with 2 speeds on the market, but i have only run into a few situations where i actually NEEDED it.

the last time was a 1970's den with floor to ceiling t&g cedar and a few pieces needed to be replaced. the old growth cedar was 1/2" and nothing anyone could get me. with only 120 lin ft. of material to be made, i still couldn't justify the cost when the local yard would do it for me for $50.

i still can't walk in the depot or yard without stoping and doing math in my head... trying to make a good enough justification to buy this machine i have no work for...

so if you own one, do you put it to good use?
 

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If by"MILLING MACHINE" you mean surface planer---I had the same thoughts many years ago--

All my tools have to pay for themselves,and quickly.

I bought a DeWalt 12 1/2" planer for myself to make square spindles for my own home.

The thing is an absolute necessity. I install a lot of cabinets and do general remodeling.

I also build the occasional cabinet. If you used it for nothing more than removing the saw marks from the edge of cut pieces like face frame parts --you could justify the cost.

If you own one you will find more and more uses for it. Mine has been rebuilt twice--I try to keep several sets of blades in the shop.

Buy one if you do much finish carpentry--You will wonder how you lived without it.--MIKE--
 

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Remodeling Specialist
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A milling machine is a metal workers device for surface cutting boring and planning. It looks much like a gigantic drill press.

I'm betting you are thinking surface planer.
Very useful but I find a jointer does more work in my shop than my planer.
Occasionally I plane stuff to match work but seldom.

I've seen those portable 12 inch planers in many a shop and truck for occasional work and they seem reasonable enough and small enough to hide away when not in use. We generally plane down pine and poplar for cabinet and vanity draws.

Other than that ...not much else.
 

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Hi--I guess I didn't make myself clear--When I cut the pieces for the face frames ,I'll cut them just a bit wider than I need---Then run them through the planer ON EDGE-and plane them to the finished width.

I use mine a lot. I do inside finish work--It's nice to be able to make a perfect(oh don't I wish) fit or a floor transition strip-- Lots of uses if you have one.--MIKE--
 

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I just picked up a jet JPM 13 planer/molder, I really haven't used it yet but it was like new & I got it for 500$ off CL. The added benefit of making or matching molding seems pretty cool. The knives are reasonably priced & you can buy custom molding knives.
 

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Finish Carpenter
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4,999 Posts
I heard the grizzle blades are junk compared to some of the nicer things out there.

Try this guy....

http://www.customouldingknives.com/ProfileCatalog.html

You can get the knives in three materials...
V2 HSS (Economy Grade)- 16.00 per inch of steel needed.
V2 steel is the latest in HSS technology. It is great for long runs of
softwoods and medium runs of hardwoods.

M2 HSS (Quality Grade)
- 18.00 per inch of steel needed.
M2 steel is our premium HSS. It is great for longer runs in both
softwoods and hardwoods. For even longer runs in hardwoods
and exotic woods see Black Nitride below.

Black Nitride (High Grade)
- 22.00 per inch of steel needed.
This is the best steel we have ever made knives from, please see
description below. We offer it in both Williams and Hussey (and
Shop Fox) and corrugated steel for the Woodmaster Molding
Head and for larger molders as well.


 
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