Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner
1 - 20 of 47 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Any old timers out there with a trick or two that keeps exterior metal trim work from "bubbling" or "wrinkling" with temperature changes? It only seems to happen on wide pieces of trim, for example an 8" flat reveal around a garage door. Facia and windows no problems.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Napco Aluminum which I believe is 0.019 inch. I was wondering about using a thicker metal for wide bends.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Should it matter though if its not face nailed to tight? I usually bend it up the sheathing and nail it there eliminating any face nailing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
New Construction. The inside of the door jambs and header both get wrinkles when its very hot. You can almost see it in the second bay on the right side.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Butcher of wood and metal
Joined
·
7,123 Posts
It gets to be a real problem on wide caps, I have hemed the piece ,used steel coil and it still seems to buckle on wide garage door wraps. The steel compared to aluminum was not much better in controling the warping. It does help some if the garage door seals are screwed down and not just nailed . The vinyl seals really transfer a lot of heat to the caps. I also make sure to have the caps in the sun to warm up before installing too. If I guy had a brake buddy to put some ribs in I think that might help too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,196 Posts
tenon0774 said:
Step the sub facia to create more bent lines in the metal.

I've noticed this since our coil supplier went to Mastic over Alcoa.

The gauge seems to be thinner.
Thats the exact same metal.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
649 Posts
Our jambs are always 8" steel channel, we don't seem to have an issue with this. We use 24 gauge steel and fully cover the jamb. So the jamb cover actually looks like a Cee, and put a hem on both sides. I think if you tried this, it would help alleviate this issue, the extra bend will help tremendously. Also I would go with a heavier gauge aluminum, maybe only use it on these situations and go with your normal for everything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,196 Posts
tenon0774 said:
Yeah, yeah...

Alcoa is Mastic.

What I should have said was when Alcoa renamed their coil stock.

I guess my point is the older Alcoa coils were thicker gauge 15 years ago.
All their coil is .019"they have always made whats called TS24 trim coil. A lot of vendors have switched to buying their S24 coil. Which is still .019" but 1lb less aluminum per 50' roll and it somehow still measures .019. A trained hand can feel the difference in how the material flexes though. Same box different label cheaper price to the distributor. Some pass on the savings some dont. We only
Use mastic for colors now white coil from them costs wayyyy too much
 
  • Like
Reactions: tenon0774

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,855 Posts
As there is that tendency with large gaps, whenever possible, I like to add a step or basically a perpendicular bend to flat to add ridgidity. Hems add some stiffness, but just at the hem and only in reducing the flex. A 90° bend really adds stiffness alng the field and if you put a hem on the bend, even more.

Do you have any close-up pictures? Maybe add a small strip of decorative Azek down the middle to stiffen that 8" field??
 

·
Pro
Joined
·
2,138 Posts
Patrick said:
All their coil is .019"they have always made whats called TS24 trim coil. A lot of vendors have switched to buying their S24 coil. Which is still .019" but 1lb less aluminum per 50' roll and it somehow still measures .019. A trained hand can feel the difference in how the material flexes though. Same box different label cheaper price to the distributor. Some pass on the savings some dont. We only
Use mastic for colors now white coil from them costs wayyyy too much
Yep.

Agreed.

My suspicion is they played with the composition somehow during the melting process.

Maybe they're using more recycled materials that have more impurities in the aluminum.

Don't know. I'm not a chemist.

You're right, it's different to the guys who use it and have used it for years, so now we have to react to that as installers.
 
1 - 20 of 47 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top