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I have been doing residential drywall hanging for a while now, but i have gotten many invitations to bid on commercial jobs or big buildings, that is 4 stories or higher. I know that these buildings all have metal studs and there fore drywall hanging gets more expensive and harder to do. can anyone give prices on what I should charge and what to expect for this.
for example, this one jobs have 264 condominium units in 8 stories, metal studs, so how would I go about bidding on that?? My supplier has no problem giving me some prices, but I prefer suggestions from people on the field. how much would your crew charge to do this job, plus my profit? thanks
 

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Professional Tradesman
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NSolano said:
I have been doing residential drywall hanging for a while now, but i have gotten many invitations to bid on commercial jobs or big buildings, that is 4 stories or higher. I know that these buildings all have metal studs and there fore drywall hanging gets more expensive and harder to do. can anyone give prices on what I should charge and what to expect for this.
for example, this one jobs have 264 condominium units in 8 stories, metal studs, so how would I go about bidding on that?? My supplier has no problem giving me some prices, but I prefer suggestions from people on the field. how much would your crew charge to do this job, plus my profit? thanks
I have installed quite a bit of drywall on metal studs, and find it no more difficult. Some commercial sites use different gauge studs which sometimes it takes an additional second for the screw to grab but no more difficult in my opinion.
 

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what gauge stud are you going 2 hang.16 ga. or stronger takes longer 2 screw.25 ga. is what they call tincan can be a pita due 2 the screws stripping out.20 ga. is the best ga. 2 hang on.will u be standing it up or
layin it down.
steve
 

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Housewright & Woodwright
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I have used some metal studding on a few projects (mostly for curiousity and to see how the studs worked vs. wood) and found it no harder to hang board on then wood. The only exception was that I had to use metal drywall screws instead of the usual wood ones. :cheesygri

As far as pricing goes.....it would be the same as pricing for hanging on wood framing.
 

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I feel it is a little harder, and more time consuming than hanging on wood.

You have to have a screwgun with you at all times, and most of the time you have to hold the stud until you get the first screw in to keep it from twisting.
 

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major difference between hanging on metal instead of wood studs is that the board is virtually always stood up versus being hung horizontaly on wood studs. Which generally works out very well since as was previously mentioned, seldom do you hang lids with metal framing, it'll be a suspended grid ceiling in 99% of the cases. When screwing down the sheets, you should always start at the bottom of the sheet & work you way up the stud, this keeps the studs from twisting away from the screw as it comes thru the sheet. As far as what to charge, I charge a tad less than residential work, in order to keep in line with the competition and also you have to consider the no lids thing, hanging lids typically takes at least 20% longer than walling out a job. :Thumbs:
 

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I'm a commercial builder in VA. and I pay my drywallers $17 a sheet (10' vertical) labor to hang, tape, block, skim and point-up. All the drywallers I know like metal stud over wood, no warped studs, no glue and no ceilings. Just remember to use fine thread screws, not coarse like you use in wood.
 

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Metal Stud Framer
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Metal stud walls have to be hung a certain way, all inside corners have a locking stud so one has to check everything out in order to hang correctly. Wood wall have channels in the corners so it really doesn't matter which wall in hung first.
 

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Nsolano,

I've been doing commercial work exclusively for the last 10 years. I find that you you should be able to charge more for doing commercial work. The people you are working for will be able to write off the work (as opposed to home owners) and will make a profit off the work you do for them. I guess it also depends on what the market is like in your area.

As far as boarding on steel as opposed to wood, I find it much easier (no warped studs, if the framer screwed up, easier to bend or move a stud, etc...).. Just beware of hard bevels on the board (can be time consuming to remove the screws that spin out). If you do encounter hard bevels, tell your guys to put their guns on reverse before they set a screw (kinda helps countersink the screws).

Good luck!!!
 

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NSolano, charge the regular plus add yourself on a few hundred in leniency. The bottom line....NEVER feel out a customer for top dollar. General contractors will pay a little extra if they feel you have a stronger grasp of the situation than the other guy. Generals dont want hassles and they will pay extra for the right guy(s) They want a guy to bid it,get it done and pick up his check. They donrt want people constantly coming to them with problems.They will not cut your throat over a few hundred bucks I can guarantee that.I would always bid a job than tell them if the price was not what they expected call me and lets compare apples to apples. Be prepared to justify your cost......Good Luck
 

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Hey Bob.....trust me guy...the drywall situation aint all that good here....lol.
I'm trying to get a few small projects going on down in florida just to get in down there. I got somw good crews, but I really wanna relocate
 
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