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Remodeler
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Discussion Starter #1
I just went on an estimate for a Insurance Co. (their office), in a commercial building. I am not experienced with metal framing and need some help here. I understand the walls are all temporary in this building. Metal studs up to the drop ceiling and tied in some way above the ceiling. I'm confident I can figure out the top. But how do I secure the bottom sill to the floor without making it permanent? Also I am lost with the estimating. I have a couple feelers out for the door but have no idea how to price this. How to fasten the door frame to the studs and the sill plat to the floor. I am not so concerned with the pricing I think I can figure that part out. I just want to be sure I have some idea of what I'm doing and like the idea of getting my feet wet in commercial work.
Thanks as always.
 

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Finish Carpentry
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396 Posts
OK I'm going to do this step by step

In commercial work the plates are called track (top track,bottom track)

1. If the ceiling tiles are flat you can screw the track right to the ceiling tee's.

2. If the ceiling tiles are kerfed (protruding past the ceiling grid) you can place a nailer above the grid, like another track, rip of plywood or a 2x4 and screw through the ceiling tee's into the nailer.

3. For the bottom track you can fasten it down with a powder acuated nail gun stagering the pins every other stud, if you don't have one of those or don't want to rent one you can use a hammer drill with a 3/16 bit, 16d duplex nails and wire like they use to tie rebar. Drill down 1-1/2" to 2", insert the wire until it hits bottom bend it flat, nail the 16d duplex until it hits bottom and bend flat also.
Both will be secure enough so you won't have to worry but will be easy to remove when the time comes with a hammer and a flat bar.

4. DO NOT SCREW INTO THE CEILING MAINS ONLY THE TEE'S! ! ! the tee's are a 100% easier to replace in case they decide to keep the ceiling.

5. You are dealing with an insurance company on their own turf, make sur you document everthing.

GOOD LUCK
 

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Remodeler
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Discussion Starter #3
I understand what you explained but I'm still not sure how screwing the top track into cross Ts can support a door opening, closing, getting slammed etc. The ceiling tiles are flat but as I take it I think I would still be better off adding support above and screwing thru the cross ts into the support. I can probably make that support pretty solid.
Thank you for your help and comment on the documentation. I will do just that.
 

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Finish Carpentry
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396 Posts
Sorry, I forgot about the door.

could you let me know if the door frame is a knock-down or a welded frame?
The process is a little different for each.
 

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Remodeler
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824 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
All I have on the door so far is a Benchmark unit with adjustable closure jamb steel skin pre hung. My RFQ doesn't mention knockdown or not. I can find out Monday.
 

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check with your local drywall supplier about drywall bead ( 200 bead?)for the top where the drywall meets the ceiling. looks like a T it keeps the mud off the ceiling tile and half the T peels of giving you a clean edge. Knock down jambs come in 3 pieces you put together after drywall finishing, welded frames comes as stated welded as one unit installed before drywall screwed to the studs inside the stud channel. 1st Knock down jamb will take you 20 min. 2nd jamb 8 mins.
 

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Finish Carpentry
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396 Posts
OK the framing will be the same as a knock down frame.

Cut two studs for each side of the opening full height, then you use the track to make a header.
Cut the track to the R.O. + 6" so you can make 3" tabs on each side to attach to the studs then you just fill in the studs on layout above the door and the double studs gives you a nailer for the trim.:thumbsup:
 

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Another way to sturdy the top track above the door it to cut a piece of track as n.e. discribed for the header and attach it from the top track up to either the roof or floor joists above. do it in a couple places at different angles to elimanate the wobble.
 

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Metal Stud Framer
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180 Posts
It depends on what kind of door frame. There are different rough openings for different door frames, for instance Timely frames are one inch for the header above the door openings and for knock downs it is forty inches at the base of the door frame. Knock downs are installed first in existing buildings by demo-ing the space around the door jamb with the R/O dimensions of the door to be installed which depends on the kind of frame to be installed.
Timely frames rough opening are 37 1/4" wide and 85" in height for a three by seven door frame, for example. Hollow steel door frames on the other hand for the same door size would be 40" X 87".
Installing would depend on the door frame. Let me know and I'll give you exact instruction....
 
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