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Sometimes ya. Shingles are a little cheaper though and work in transitions much better.

We just replaced a pole barn steel roof twice in one year. The house (on same property) with shingles didn't have damage. CT Landmark's. Some fascia's, soffit, and metal roofs. Anything metal was damaged aside from our steel vents on the house.


Here a square of metal is cheaper then shingles, I can do a steel roof for the same or less then shingles.

Yes I agree transitions can be a little tricky at times, but you learn over time what works the best.

Can't say I have ever replaced a steel roof here in almost 20 years.
 

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Here a square of metal is cheaper then shingles, I can do a steel roof for the same or less then shingles.

This explains a lot of the issues I am reading about dents, use and plastic caps showing through. Upgrade your steel!!!!!! Never use anything thinner then 24 gauge and you will see all these issues go away.
 

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In using plastic cap nails do you have any problem with the caps showing through the metal?

I have seen some of the metal roofs shinglers have put on. :rolleyes:
That's why we've switched to using slap staples for the underlayment, one step on a panel over a button cap and you've got a ding.
 

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The great quote is that steel panels are for pole barns....BS!

Steel panel roofing, whether it be classic panel (ag panel is another name) or snap lock, or whatever trade name, is coming on hard because:

Insurance companies are not going to keep buying roofs, year after year, after hail storms, and panelized roofs generally withstand hail well, especially when installed directly over decking. Yeah, there are hail resistant shingles out there, and people who refuse metal on their roofs...but when it costs thousands more to insure, and thousands more to replace, more people get over their issues in favor of saving money.

We install metal on nearly every new home we build. Saves on energy costs in the summer as well, and the standard here is 26 guage metal. UL Class 3 rated.
 

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I'm just not a fan of thru-fastened panels on a residential roof. I prefer concealed fastener panels or standing seam, also heavier 24 gauge.

I'm not in residential construction, just saying for my own roof, that's what I would want or recommend. Almost all of the roofs we install are standing seam and we provide 20 year weather tightness warrantees.
 

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diplomat
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The great quote is that steel panels are for pole barns....BS!

Steel panel roofing, whether it be classic panel (ag panel is another name) or snap lock, or whatever trade name, is coming on hard because:

Insurance companies are not going to keep buying roofs, year after year, after hail storms, and panelized roofs generally withstand hail well, especially when installed directly over decking. Yeah, there are hail resistant shingles out there, and people who refuse metal on their roofs...but when it costs thousands more to insure, and thousands more to replace, more people get over their issues in favor of saving money.

We install metal on nearly every new home we build. Saves on energy costs in the summer as well, and the standard here is 26 guage metal. UL Class 3 rated.
Where I started building, Fairbanks Alaska, most people realize that steel is the superior roof. I didn't realize anyone thought otherwise.

I like your thoughts about flex for long runs when fastening through the rib. I've had to use two overlapped panels in that case.
 

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The great quote is that steel panels are for pole barns....BS!

Steel panel roofing, whether it be classic panel (ag panel is another name) or snap lock, or whatever trade name, is coming on hard because:

Insurance companies are not going to keep buying roofs, year after year, after hail storms, and panelized roofs generally withstand hail well, especially when installed directly over decking. Yeah, there are hail resistant shingles out there, and people who refuse metal on their roofs...but when it costs thousands more to insure, and thousands more to replace, more people get over their issues in favor of saving money.

We install metal on nearly every new home we build. Saves on energy costs in the summer as well, and the standard here is 26 guage metal. UL Class 3 rated.
I believe I posted how we replaced steel before shingles from hail damage on he same property. Steel costs more to install and condensation, etc.. are problems for a home (in this region anyhow). People really like when that ice dam and 4 feet of snow come sliding off their roof onto their sidewalk and in front of their doors also.;)

I can count on one hand the houses around here that have steel on the roof. Not sure about you guys, but we buy our steel for pole barns from a place that sells and builds only pole barns.

Some large businesses have copper or steel roofs, but it is always standing seam. No exposed fasteners, except on pole barns.
 

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Randy that damage is what I like to call the drum effect. With no wood under it the metal is going stretch to its stopping point. That causes dents. Wood does not allow that.
 

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Randy that damage is what I like to call the drum effect. With no wood under it the metal is going stretch to its stopping point. That causes dents. Wood does not allow that.
It does on shingles. Why would it not dent steel?
Are you saying that you are installing steel directly to the roof deck?

Some have reported hail that broke the OSB underneath the shingles.

I understand some regions using steel, but it's not bulletproof like they love to claim.
 

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I have to add that in some areas around here steel is used more and more. Usually in the trailer parks and in areas where the Native Americans live. No offense by those comments, but they do like to throw tin over things and call it good.

Some really drawn out homeowners go as far as just buying tarps in the very rural areas.
 

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24g standing seam laid flat over a solid deck will not dent in a hailstorm less you have baseballs falling. And for those concerned about condensation, what minimal amount you have in a normal house will hit the back of the panel and land on your synthetic underlayment and run out or escape as it heats. If not its usually lack of insulation

I am installing ribbed on my barn due to cost, however when it comes time to do the house i would only consider standing seam due to looks and the fact that im not crazy about depending on a 4 cent washer to protect me from ice dammed water 15 years from now
 
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24g standing seam laid flat over a solid deck will not dent in a hailstorm less you have baseballs falling.

I am installing ribbed on my barn due to cost, however when it comes time to do the house i would only consider standing seam due to looks and the fact that im not crazy about depending on a 4 cent washer to protect me from ice dammed water 15 years from now
Exactly:clap::thumbup:
 

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24g standing seam laid flat over a solid deck will not dent in a hailstorm less you have baseballs falling. And for those concerned about condensation, what minimal amount you have in a normal house will hit the back of the panel and land on your synthetic underlayment and run out or escape as it heats. If not its usually lack of insulation

I am installing ribbed on my barn due to cost, however when it comes time to do the house i would only consider standing seam due to looks and the fact that im not crazy about depending on a 4 cent washer to protect me from ice dammed water 15 years from now
I'll have to disagree. 1-1/2" hail will dent steel fascia's that are on a 2x6 subfascia. Not as easy as aluminum, but it will.

I'll agree with not depending on exposed fasteners on a steel roof over a home.

I believe we all know how steel moves around with heat and cold. Just listen when the sun comes out standing by a house with steel siding.

Not a chance I would install steel directly to a roof deck. I've seen it rot out the roof deck and rust an entire steel panel ceiling in a building.

I'm not a fan of installing an air exchanger in an attic just for a steel roof which is in no way superior to a shingled roof.
 

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24g standing seam laid flat over a solid deck will not dent in a hailstorm less you have baseballs falling. And for those concerned about condensation, what minimal amount you have in a normal house will hit the back of the panel and land on your synthetic underlayment and run out or escape as it heats. If not its usually lack of insulation

I am installing ribbed on my barn due to cost, however when it comes time to do the house i would only consider standing seam due to looks and the fact that im not crazy about depending on a 4 cent washer to protect me from ice dammed water 15 years from now
I have to ask....Where will it run out? The end of the panel that is open? The area for bats, insects, bees, etc.... to enter and build a home?
Just an obvious observation.

There is a reason they stopped using metal to make windows.

I am asking here. Inform me.
 

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MJW said:
I have to ask....Where will it run out? The end of the panel that is open? The area for bats, insects, bees, etc.... to enter and build a home?
Just an obvious observation.

There is a reason they stopped using metal to make windows.

I am asking here. Inform me.
On a ribbed panel there are tons of places for insects and rodents to get in i wont argue that. On a standing seam roof it is no worse off than a shingle roof

When did they stop using metal to make windows?
 
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