Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
King of Caulk
Joined
·
190 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I searched through old posts and got some good information. But it brought up some questions I have a good quality generator for the house (gillette 10/13 kw) I wanted to get a pair of meters to measure the amps on each leg to make sure we're not overloading it. My question revolved around how to arrive at the total draw. Seeing as this is dependent on the types of loads, and they will be mixed (fridge, water heater, range etc) I am unsure of how to measure the load (both legs added, highest leg) not concerned about getting highly accurate readings Just a reasonable picture of how close we are to the capacity of the generator.

This also made me wonder if I should be concerned about balancing the load. on each leg. I was not because the big items are all 220.
 

·
Electrical Contractor
Joined
·
244 Posts
I assume you are using a manual transfer switch. One way to be certain is to make sure your overcurrent protective device is not larger than what the generator can handle. If you overload it the load will trip the breaker. The other way is to just use an standard amp meter and test each leg. You could do a calculation but you would have to itemize all loads to phases A and B (yes I know that they are not truly different phases) but that is not feasible as the loads are not all on at the same time. Normally one would do a calculation.

The biggest problem you may have is with a/c or electric heat... a/c units bog down a genset a lot so depending on the size it could be an issue. 10 kw is a fairly generous size genny except in all electric houses.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top