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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If you fell a live tree mill it into lumber how long do you need to wait to use it if you air dry. If you air dry before you mill it how long? (just wondering)
 

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Depends on what moisture content you are looking for, the conditions under which it is air drying and the moisture content of the timber when you started.
 

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Stacked and stickered red oak, 5/4 will take at least 2 years to air dry and you probably won't get it down to 8% mc.

Then you need a facer, slr an either a double surfacer or 4 sided planer.

LOL those be great to have

Resaw (optional) Table saw, Jionter and Thickness Planer work too... Just a bit more manual labor.
 

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If you air dry before you mill it how long? (just wondering)



Probably close to forever. It will probably rot away before it is dry. Wood (especially logs) loose most of their moisture out of end grain,with bark still on,drying will come close to not happening.
 

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Stacked and stickered red oak, 5/4 will take at least 2 years to air dry and you probably won't get it down to 8% mc.

Then you need a facer, slr an either a double surfacer or 4 sided planer.
General rule of thumb, stickered inside. 1 year per inch of thickness Around here, wood balances in moisture to around 12%. Even wood that's been kiln dried will balance to 10-12% if not stored in climate controlled environment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I know I'll get made fun of for asking but what if you fell a tree and mill it with an Alaskan mill then cut to the dimensions you want what do you need to do after that.
 

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General rule of thumb, stickered inside. 1 year per inch of thickness Around here, wood balances in moisture to around 12%. Even wood that's been kiln dried will balance to 10-12% if not stored in climate controlled environment.
You need air flow, inside a building with no air movement is going to take longer.

10% MC max for me.

I would still count on two years dry time.
 

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I know I'll get made fun of for asking but what if you fell a tree and mill it with an Alaskan mill then cut to the dimensions you want what do you need to do after that.
It will shrink, it will probably cup and twist.
You may get lucky if you stack and sticker it and put a couple thousand pounds on top of it to keep it flat.
 

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These guys are crybabies.

All you need are tools and time, baby!

I helped my father in law chop up a white oak tree for use as a keel in the boat he's building. We milled it with the help of a friend and his portable sawmill. Stacked it up, painted the end grains, covered the tops in little corrugated tin shanty dealies, then waited 7 years for it to dry.
You'd be surprised how fast 7 years goes!
 

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We have a local lumber yard that mainly deals with reclaimed material. They have a ban saw mill and a small kiln. If you have some unique logs they will mill and dry them.
Most material that you cut at home is only good for livestock fencing, cribbing, etc.
 
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