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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I'm interested in making some jigs for repetitive cuts on a tile saw to maximize repeatabliity. Most of what I require is to connect granite at right angles.

So in asking around, people have suggested using glue - liquid nails specific for marble has been suggested.

Is this adequate or do I need to do something else? Do I need to do any surface preparation of the surfaces being glued, either roughing or smoothing it?

Can I just glue one piece to another or do I need to inlay the pieces or shape any more complex joins?

I'm guessing that this should be straightforward, but before going forward, if I'm missing anything, please let me know. The glue join will be subjected to water, but not continuously submerged if that makes a difference in terms of glue type.

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Ken
 

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I'm no counter top guy but what about the same epoxy that they use to fill seams? If it's good enough to hold long runs of granite counters in place (and deal with possible counter top liquids, spills, etc), one would think it should be fine for your small jigs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think we are thinking of the same thing - the stuff that they use for gluing the bullnose trim on to the main pieces. What is the name of the epoxy you are describing?

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Ken
 

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Hi! You sure do come up with some fun questions.
Any good 2 part epoxy(looks like a syringe with two openings)
Buy it from a busy store--It has a shelf life-Sure would be nice if they had the expiration date like milk has!!!!!--MIKE
 

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WEST is the best,I was told by the epoxy guru. However all brands are good enough for what you are doing.
Guru also said,"Get the slow setting kind-Much stronger bond than the 5 minute stuff."
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, Mike. Makes sense. I usually find that quicker setting is more rigid - and while harder is more easily breakable.

Much appreciated.

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Ken
 
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