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Our kd is usually clean and pitch free. Same quality or better than the green.

Sometimes it is hard to tell from #1 doug fir. 2x6 is usually better than 2x4. 10 footers usually a bit better than 8s.

This is all pre-covid. It is now starting to get back to nice lumber again.

Even our PT is usually check and wane free. Straight as a proverbial board.

Wouldn't use anything else.



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Some mills put out top notch lumber. Some churn out garbage. Depends on the trees . Some put out both.
This is the answer. The mills can tell if the lumber will twist just based on the bark on the logs they saw.

Some species twisting is going to happen. A lot of the green lumber up here is hemlock. Hemlock grows twisted, so it twists as it dries.

If I'm worried about bow, twist, etc, I'll put 2 rows of whalers on the wall to keep everything in place and planed, and remove them as drywall goes on. Almost never happens.

I pick my own lumber, so I can avoid warp, twist, bow.

The mill should have known before they sawed the logs they weren't suitable for framing.

Once you open a lift of green lumber, you better get it on in a hurry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Why would you think that? Once it hits the yard, it’s theirs. Once it hits your site, it’s yours. How long you been a P.M.?


Mike
It is "theirs" once it hits the yard but that doesn't mean they couldn't ask the mill for compensation if they were sent substandard product. I know that's the mills problem but sometimes helping people solve their problems benefits both parties. I've never worked at or owned a lumber yard so I don't really know what kind of recourse they have with their suppliers. I haven't had problems returning lumber to my supplier in the past but I haven's used a supplier this small or who doesn't do much commercial work in the past.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
I can't imagine ordering green lumber for FRAMING (outside of getting green lumber from an Amish mill for framing a barn). we've only ever used green lumber for ceder siding or fencing. Since this was a school, what do the architectural prints spec? If it was a cost-saving measure when lumber prices skyrocketed it was a BAD decision, would have been better switching to metal studs.
I agree switching to metal studs for the interior walls would have been a good way to go. But I don't think they wanted to wasted the time to change design once the plans have been designed and been through all the approvals that schools have to go through.
 

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So is green framing lumber more of a west coast thing? I don't think I have ever used or heard of it before. I'm in central Virginia though. Don't remember it when I was in Wisconsin either, but that was a while ago. Everything is kiln dried here unless you get something custom cut from small, local mill.
 

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So is green framing lumber more of a west coast thing? I don't think I have ever used or heard of it before. I'm in central Virginia though. Don't remember it when I was in Wisconsin either, but that was a while ago. Everything is kiln dried here unless you get something custom cut from small, local mill.
Seems so.

All our framing lumber is green.
 

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Interesting hearing about the regional differences. In southern NM with our low humidity if something isn’t KD it warps and twists. 4x4’s come in green and after a couple of days there will be 30 degree twist minimum.
Only thing that isn’t to bad is western cedar. It drys out quickly on it’s own.


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