Contractor Talk - Professional Construction and Remodeling Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
90%-er
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just got back from looking at a job in a house built in 1834. Dude is looking to get just under 1000 square feet of new hardwood installed, broken up into three adjacent rooms.

Original-ish wood floors are still in the house, but over the last 200 years the floors have gotten pretty uneven. Dips here, rises there. Nothing extreme, but it needs to be a lot closer to perfect for the new flooring.

What am I getting myself into if I pour self leveling cement in these three rooms? The guy got a stupidly fat payout from his insurance company (a burst pipe in a bathroom started all of this mess originally), so we can spend on materials. Is it practical to mix up and pour that many bags of SLC?

Is there another way, short of building a new false floor in each room, to get these floors leveled out that I am not thinking of? All of the joists are original, and they're full dimensional lumber in a fairly dank basement. I don't really want to start ripping out and replacing them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,795 Posts
Just got back from looking at a job in a house built in 1834. Dude is looking to get just under 1000 square feet of new hardwood installed, broken up into three adjacent rooms.

Original-ish wood floors are still in the house, but over the last 200 years the floors have gotten pretty uneven. Dips here, rises there. Nothing extreme, but it needs to be a lot closer to perfect for the new flooring.

What am I getting myself into if I pour self leveling cement in these three rooms? The guy got a stupidly fat payout from his insurance company (a burst pipe in a bathroom started all of this mess originally), so we can spend on materials. Is it practical to mix up and pour that many bags of SLC?

Is there another way, short of building a new false floor in each room, to get these floors leveled out that I am not thinking of? All of the joists are original, and they're full dimensional lumber in a fairly dank basement. I don't really want to start ripping out and replacing them.
For that much, look into getting it pumped in. I had a client that had it done for a basement floor prep.
 

·
Contractor of the Month
Joined
·
26,075 Posts
There are companies that truck it in, I don't think you could mix those buckets fast enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,170 Posts
I've done 1,000 sq.ft. with no problem with just one other guy. The questions I have first,do you really want to add all that extra weight to 200 yr. joist over a "dank" basement ? Second,how will you affix new wood thru self leveling concrete ? The job I mentioned was over a concrete floor.
 

·
90%-er
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Some good points here fellas, thanks.

I could definitely do it one room at a time, for the leveling part at least.

Didn't know anyone pumped in that stuff though, that makes sense too. Is that amount going to be actually self-leveling, or will we need to be in there working it a bit as it's poured?

How would I go about guestimating how many yards of it I'd need? One per room?

The weight is a valid point, but I'm not concerned about the weight and I don't think most of you would be if you saw the way this thing was constructed. There is a lot of thick lumber down there. Dank might have been the wrong adjective for the basement....it's just a bit dark and has a fairly low ceiling. Not really a wet environment.

Cannot believe I didn't project ahead to attaching the wood down......I've never done anything except nail the stuff down. Can I glue it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
77 Posts
That uneveness suggests movement over time - More sag, swelling etc. Cement might eventually crack.

Sent from my XT1053 using Tapatalk
 

·
Contractor of the Month
Joined
·
26,075 Posts
Some good points here fellas, thanks.

I could definitely do it one room at a time, for the leveling part at least.

Didn't know anyone pumped in that stuff though, that makes sense too. Is that amount going to be actually self-leveling, or will we need to be in there working it a bit as it's poured?

How would I go about guestimating how many yards of it I'd need? One per room?

The weight is a valid point, but I'm not concerned about the weight and I don't think most of you would be if you saw the way this thing was constructed. There is a lot of thick lumber down there. Dank might have been the wrong adjective for the basement....it's just a bit dark and has a fairly low ceiling. Not really a wet environment.

Cannot believe I didn't project ahead to attaching the wood down......I've never done anything except nail the stuff down. Can I glue it?
I don't have much experience with self leveling, but the few I have done showed me that it's anything but self-leveling. It all needs to by toyed with a little.

Lafarge has a self-leveling product, as well there are companies that do gypcrete.

http://www.lafarge.com/en/agilia
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Prepped correctly, SLC is the best viable option for drastic elevation changes in small areas and floating minor feather-outs, any where in between sounds risky in this application.
If possible, you might consider glued shimming between joist and subfloor(solid or sistered), to get existing floor close enough to cut with a drum sander, then glue and nail new layer of hardwood at adjacent angle. This method is best for strength and longevity if the experienced labor time can be afforded, and your not risking screwing up a bunch of doors n windows in the process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I would think a yard would cover the entire area of 1000 sqft a plaster pump should be able to pump it
how thick are you going?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
There are a lot of variations we don't know here. How much height difference are you dealing with? How complicated is the layout? What is the current sub-floor?

I'd assume it's 1x pine diagonal across the joists which isn't supportive of SLU. At that point you'll have to lay down 3/8" ply minimum, then add SLU so your height gain may be significant.

Is it possible to remove the existing subfloor, add shims on top of the joists, then go down with t&g 3/4" plywood? That would simplify hardwood installation (I'm assuming it's traditional and not a floating floor) and would likely result in a better over-all result. probably less expensive too.

Adding significant weight to old joists wouldn't be my first choice.
 

·
90%-er
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
It is dimensional wood of one kind or the other for the subfloor, but there is a layer of old hardwood above it, set at the perpendicular angle.

The height difference is not crazy; we're talking a half inch here and there. It's more that the floor is wavy then it is a dramatic change in level. A little peak here, a little valley there, etc.

I suppose removing the flooring and shimming T&G ply is something to consider....I might need to head back to the house and consider it.

The layout is simple. We're talking three square rooms. Very standard. Except for the kitchen, no obstructions to consider, and one of our quotes is for remodeling the kitchen anyway so that'll hopefully be part of the package.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
30 Posts
First you'll want to check into the SLU manufacturer's recommendations on pouring over solid wood of any kind. I'm not aware of one that allows it. I'm guessing you're planning on pulling out the old hardwood anyway. So that leads back to installing 3/8"-1/2" exterior glued plywood, then pouring over it.

Overall I'd expect it to be the easier prep method, but then you'll be committed to glueing down the new hardwood which isn't something I'm familiar with. I've been under the impression you should only glue down engineered hardwood. Solid wood has minor bows in it that can't be fixed when gluing in place, which is why engineered is the better option in this application. Solid wood directly over a concrete slab is a no-no.

But what do I know.:eek:
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top