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I'm 23 and live in a rural area about 30 minutes outside of Kansas City. I've been working at a water utility company since the beginning of 2013. Pay isn't great and not much hope of decent raises, but its got full benefits. The work isn't bad, I want freedom to make my own hours. I get great satisfaction on doing work on my own, its what I love to do.

I come from a farming background, dad was a row crop farmer and got out of it a few years ago. I love the farm life so the past couple summers I've started baling small square bales of hay. I had to get a couple used pieces of equipment on my own and I am working on building this business. I have a good start cause we already had a couple tractors I can use and the land my family owns. This is something that I really enjoy doing and am passionate about.

My dream is to work for my self, I just absolutely hate working for others, I just don't get the satisfaction from it. I'm a very hard worker, I do whatever it takes. I'm not afraid of any type of manual labor. Looking for some ideas of a business that can supplement my hay business. Maybe something that can utilize the tractors I have? I've thought about fencing, I've helped install barbwire fence for livestock but never any residential or commercial fence. I just cant see my self working for someone for 30+ years. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated. I don't have much debt of any kind and don't have children so I can afford to take a little more risk than someone with a family to feed.
 

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My answer isn't trade related but outside of baling you could also offer bush hogging, fertilizing and spraying.

I don't know how much snow you get but you could possibly offer to clean parking lots in the winter.

Trying to think of things that you could use a tractor for.
 

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Young-Guy Framer
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You'll get better advice from others here than what I have to give, but here's my two cents.

I'm 21, and like you, I'm not an employee-type person. For me, it's not so much about wanting to make my own hours, rather it's the desire to have the sole responsibility of my own success or failure. I know from running my own company that I started (not trade related) that running your own business is by no means as romantic as it's made out to be. You start out by working way more hours for way less money, and it's no longer just showing up, working hard, doing your job, and collecting a pay check. There's a new responsibilities and hats you'll have to wear if you start your own business, and I'm not going to get into them here.

My advice would be not to go on your own yet. It seems to me that you need to find something you truly love doing, get damn good at it, THEN consider going out on and starting your own company. This is kind of the path I'm taking right now. Although I hate being an employee, I love carpentry. Right now, I'm working as an employee for an elite framer in my area. My intention is to learn the trade as fast as I can, then when I'm ready, I'll have the skill-set I need to do what I really want to do (start my own framing company). I find I love my job enough that it makes being an employee worthwhile. Especially since, the way I look at it, I'm learning how to be great at something I love and am getting paid to do it. I suggest you do the same.

I know this probably isn't the advice you want to hear, but it's the best I have to give. Think about it. If there was some business (and maybe there is) where someone with little to no background could just start up and make a great living, wouldn't everybody be doing it? The portable toilet rental business is the only one like that I can think of (and I don't need to get into why everyone isn't doing it). Although from what I hear, you can make a buck or two doing it...

I also advice you to try your best to fully understand what your getting into if you want to run your own company. You will not have more time. You will not have less stress. And in the beginning, you will certainly not have more freedom or more money. That being said, I wouldn't even consider choosing anything different for myself.

Cheers,
Dave
 

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Running your own business has it's ups and downs. A simple project like installing a water heater turns into a 3 day ride for the same money. 1st water heater wont light. Called the manufacture and they want to know the pressure of the gas coming in the house before they could send me any parts I might need. Contacted the gas company and they told me they could check it but with the flood repairs could not be specific on when. They came out and the pressure was good but it still wont light. Called the manufacture and he said he could e-mail me the instructions to check another item in the heater. No one is paying for all this running around and time. Finally said enough and took the heater back to the store and bought another one. A few hours later my customer had hot water. The problems encountered were not the customers problems and getting money from the manufacture was a snowballs chance in hell, you suck it up get the job done and satisfy your customer. This doesn't happen often but running your own business "customer satisfaction" is the prime objective regardless.
 

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Running your own business has it's ups and downs. A simple project like installing a water heater turns into a 3 day ride for the same money. 1st water heater wont light. Called the manufacture and they want to know the pressure of the gas coming in the house before they could send me any parts I might need. Contacted the gas company and they told me they could check it but with the flood repairs could not be specific on when. They came out and the pressure was good but it still wont light. Called the manufacture and he said he could e-mail me the instructions to check another item in the heater. No one is paying for all this running around and time. Finally said enough and took the heater back to the store and bought another one. A few hours later my customer had hot water. The problems encountered were not the customers problems and getting money from the manufacture was a snowballs chance in hell, you suck it up get the job done and satisfy your customer. This doesn't happen often but running your own business "customer satisfaction" is the prime objective regardless.
I own a plumbing company. That's a 10 minute job to get a heater running that's having trouble starting. That's what training and experience does. Getting a heater started, when you know what you are doing, is not really the ups and downs of a business per say. That's lack of education.
 

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Smarter than the brick...
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If you have a truck or a decent sized trailer you could always do construction cleanup. I know around here that it pays halfway decent and it can be done pretty much on your own schedule.
 
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