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General Contractor
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a new site for my electric fence business. Right now it is just a page on my construction site. I am tempted to mimic what i have now. http://bit.ly/Hbs9il but with html5 etc. But am trying to bring it up a notch and give myself something to do this winter.

I want a theme/framework that is lean as can be.

I like genesis Framework/studiopress (because it is clean code, well built and has a good seo base) but cannot see a theme that grabs me.

I like a theme like Avada (boxed) but it is way to bloated.

feel free to throw some ideas my way.

thanks
 

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Non-conformist
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I totally agree about Genesis. I've worked under the hood of other themes and many are just as you said...bloated junk. Genesis is probably the best one out there.

The challenge you face is if you have trouble visualizing the theme demos beyond the demos themselves. Perhaps if you can mind map or flow chart the site you need to create. Decide on a structure that you need to have to suit your site plan. Then look at the themes for their structure. Everything else is just adding paint to the walls.

Depending on your knowledge of code and CSS, you might even consider customizing the Genesis framework itself and essentially creating your own child theme. However, if you can get yourself to see beyond the decorating used in the demos, the child themes already on StudioPress should provide just about any kind of structure you could need.

Check out the Showcase galleries. That should help you see more of the potential available within the themes.
 

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General Contractor
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300 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I totally agree about Genesis. I've worked under the hood of other themes and many are just as you said...bloated junk. Genesis is probably the best one out there.

The challenge you face is if you have trouble visualizing the theme demos beyond the demos themselves. Perhaps if you can mind map or flow chart the site you need to create. Decide on a structure that you need to have to suit your site plan. Then look at the themes for their structure. Everything else is just adding paint to the walls.

Depending on your knowledge of code and CSS, you might even consider customizing the Genesis framework itself and essentially creating your own child theme. However, if you can get yourself to see beyond the decorating used in the demos, the child themes already on StudioPress should provide just about any kind of structure you could need.

Check out the Showcase galleries. That should help you see more of the potential available within the themes.
thanks Steve.

I am working on my child theme now.

I did draw my site out on paper and know what I want. now I am just trying to get it all into my new custom theme.
 

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Non-conformist
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You're welcome Dan. The CSS is a mile long but it's well organized and I find there's not much you can't do or customize. These themes are very well planned out.

I was looking over studio press not to long ago and at first their themes leave a lot to be desired. But the gallery of finished sites is quite a remarkable transformation.

http://www.studiopress.com/theme/streamline
I had about the same impression when I first saw the themes and demos and it took a little while to get acclimated to the back end because it varies a bit from the way most themes are laid out. My appreciation quickly grew though because when you get used to it, you realize they had some very good reasons for the way they designed these. It allows fine tuned control of just about everything which the lack thereof was always a frustration for me previously. I even appreciate WP more now so I hate it less than I used to.

Some things in WP are still more convoluted compared to conventional design, but that's the price of making it user friendly so anyone can learn it without requiring coding skill. For most people, WP will be the best discovery you ever made. My hatred of it is just based on the fact that routine tasks are easier and faster using Dreamweaver on a custom site and I don't get slowed down by the database or extra layers of complexity using the WP interface. That's something non web designers don't have to worry about.

With StudioPress, the relative simplicity of the themes is their strength. It allows virtually unlimited customizing without being restrained or forced into a mold. They're good as is for the novice or person less inclined to customize, and they're ideal for the highest level of pro and everyone in between. And unlike many other themes, the code is standards compliant. That may not seem like an concern if you don't plan to touch the code, but it's very much an issue if you want search engines and site visitors to not have problems with your site.
 

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General Contractor
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You're welcome Dan. The CSS is a mile long but it's well organized and I find there's not much you can't do or customize. These themes are very well planned out.



I had about the same impression when I first saw the themes and demos and it took a little while to get acclimated to the back end because it varies a bit from the way most themes are laid out. My appreciation quickly grew though because when you get used to it, you realize they had some very good reasons for the way they designed these. It allows fine tuned control of just about everything which the lack thereof was always a frustration for me previously. I even appreciate WP more now so I hate it less than I used to.

Some things in WP are still more convoluted compared to conventional design, but that's the price of making it user friendly so anyone can learn it without requiring coding skill. For most people, WP will be the best discovery you ever made. My hatred of it is just based on the fact that routine tasks are easier and faster using Dreamweaver on a custom site and I don't get slowed down by the database or extra layers of complexity using the WP interface. That's something non web designers don't have to worry about.

With StudioPress, the relative simplicity of the themes is their strength. It allows virtually unlimited customizing without being restrained or forced into a mold. They're good as is for the novice or person less inclined to customize, and they're ideal for the highest level of pro and everyone in between. And unlike many other themes, the code is standards compliant. That may not seem like an concern if you don't plan to touch the code, but it's very much an issue if you want search engines and site visitors to not have problems with your site.
that is all good, but it is all just added bloat.
 

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Non-conformist
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that is all good, but it is all just added bloat.
That wasn't added for your benefit, I doubt any of it is relevant to where you are at or that it offered much of anything new to you. But JBM made a good point and others reading this thread have different needs and considerations. This wasn't to derail your thread but to address other interested readers in the topic.

I apologize if my posting style threw you a bit but I know every conversation has people listening in for a wide variety of reasons, especially in an online forum.
 

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General Contractor
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
no worries Steve. It is all great information and I am sure it will help someone reading through here.

Update on my new site:
I am working off the Genesis framework and have found a free child theme I am customizing/heavily altering.

It is the "ElevenHundred" theme from WP Canada. The developer Len gives incredible support. At least so far he has. I was surprised at all the email responses he has given me so far.

I am liking the responsive platform/layout and how the site is rendering on my android. It is a lot easier than creating a separate mobile site and I think is more useful than pinch and zoom of the desktop version. To me the most important thing is that my phone number and email are top and center and clickable. And my content is easy to read. and the menus look/work great.
 

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Non-conformist
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Looks like a nice, clean theme and the responsive is good. I would think your problem is mostly solved unless you have technical questions.
 

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Non-conformist
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Looks like a basic boring theme alright, you going to mod it I hope?
have found a free child theme I am customizing/heavily altering.
Basic and boring can be the best place to start. For the last few versions of Dreamweaver, the built in "templates" are deliberately devoid of any prettiness so you can add whatever you please. Having structure only can be liberating.
 

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General Contractor
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300 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Looks like a basic boring theme alright, you going to mod it I hope?

that is the point JB. I wanted something lean without a bunch of features I would never use. The code is heavy enough with any Wordpress site and I am attempting to minimize that. If i did not blog as well I would probably hard code the entire site.

The author of the theme will not recognize it when I am done.
 

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Non-conformist
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html 5. huh. all you need goog for is to recognize your address and reviews. what are you talking about?
Although not a requirement, it's a good idea to use HTML5 for building a site, especially a new one. Browser support for older HTML isn't going anywhere soon and I doubt Google cares what flavor of HTML you use, but using HTML5 will never lead to regret. Plus, you don't have to use the added functionality but your site will be more scalable if you do decide to later.
 
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