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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a slab that has dropped almost 2 inches on one side of the house. I'm looking for some options on the best way to bring that up to level. Thanks for any help in advance... This apparently has been a problem in this subdivision (built in the 90's)... Many houses in this area have foundations that have dropped..
 

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I have a slab that has dropped almost 2 inches on one side of the house. I'm looking for some options on the best way to bring that up to level. Thanks for any help in advance... This apparently has been a problem in this subdivision (built in the 90's)... Many houses in this area have foundations that have dropped..
If you cannot lift the slab using suction cups, take the slab out, build it up with good clean fill or stone... temper the base and pour the new slab or a sunken section of the slab.
 

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Grout pumping
 
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im thinking dependent upon size of area..length xwidth vs amount of decline that a sand mix/mud job would be cheaper and faster..

that grout pumping seems to be used on smaller slabs and I would imagine you would crack the slab probably in multiple places trying to do that to a foundation slab.

it would probably have to be cut and done in sections which seems like a huge job.
 

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I have a slab that has dropped almost 2 inches on one side of the house. I'm looking for some options on the best way to bring that up to level. Thanks for any help in advance... This apparently has been a problem in this subdivision (built in the 90's)... Many houses in this area have foundations that have dropped..
I’m confused by your original post:

Has the slab dropped or is this a foundation problem?



If you cannot lift the slab using suction cups, take the slab out, build it up with good clean fill or stone... temper the base and pour the new slab or a sunken section of the slab.
Grout pumping
I’m with Greg on this (I think he was joking about the suction cups) – tear it out and fix it. I’ve seen mud jacking go very bad and I’m not a fan.



Curious as to how you know the sinking has stopped?
Curious to know what makes you think he knows that the sinking has stopped?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Sorry for the confusion... I realized my post was a bit ambiguous... This is a 1400 sq' home built on clay dirt... The stem (exterior) wall on one side of the house has sunk about 2 inches... This has caused the slab to crack almost down the center of the house... Breaking out the slab and re-pouring is not a problem, but how about the stem wall... You can see the wall sheet rock pulling away from the ceiling...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Hi John, Yes its a concrete slap... The house has 18" deep contrete stem (exterior) walls with 3 1/2" slab... This foundation is poured on top of clay dirt, which I've come to learn has been a fairly big problem in this area if the dirt hadn't been prepped right... The stem wall (foundation) on one side of the house has sunk about 2"... As a result the slab has cracked almost down the center of the house and you can see the wall sheet rock pulling away from the ceiling in that area. There are other areas of the house that have sunk, but much less (about 1/2 to 1")... It appears the entire foundation (stem walls) has sunk to some degree..
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
This particular area's soil is clay... As I've come to understand, it must be properly preppped before pouring your foundation...
 

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In Florida they're using an expansion mix of urethane and concrete? They drill and pump sorta like spray foam and it lifts slab, not sure if they do this inside home, the demonstration was on a driveway.
How are they stabilizing these homes, if even possible. Here they drill and pin with rods.
 

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Helical piers might be a candidate part of the solution.

But depending on where you are in California (maybe "ca" means Canada), talking about solutions might be jumping the gun. Around much of California any contractor doing the sort of work you need will be working with a geo/soils engineer. If your foundation is sinking due to local soil conditions under your house, you may have one set of solutions and expectations. If your foundation is moving because your entire subdivision is moving down-slope, you may have another set of solutions and expectations.

It can vary from street to street. If the problem is widespread in your subdivision, there's a good chance the engineers and local building department are tuned in.

I'm guessing (pardon me if I'm mistaken) that you're a homeowner, not a contractor. Lifting foundations and houses is work for a pro - someone with knowledge and experience, and insurance. Find yourself a good contractor and a good geo engineer.

- Bob
 

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I have a slab that has dropped almost 2 inches on one side of the house. I'm looking for some options on the best way to bring that up to level. Thanks for any help in advance... This apparently has been a problem in this subdivision (built in the 90's)... Many houses in this area have foundations that have dropped..
You're a LONG ways off from FLOORING solutions Bobby. This is a structural problem.

I'm thinking Swamp Castle.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aNaXdLWt17A
 
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